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Improving water productivity in the field with farmers: Farmers Field Schools on water in Jordan









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    Document
    Food and nutrition profile: The Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan 2011 2002
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    In Jordan, the staple foods are wheat and rice. Khobez, a leavened flat bread (pita bread) is consumed daily with most meals and often used to scoop other foods. Vegetables such as tomatoes, cucumbers, lettuce, bell peppers, green beans, okra, cauliflower, eggplants, spinach and summer squash occupy an important place in the diet; they are cooked with rice or as stew or are consumed raw as a salad. Yogurt is used in some dishes. Consumption of fruit (apples, oranges, bananas, grapes, figs, water melons, apricots and peaches) varies according to season.
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    Brochure, flyer, fact-sheet
    Water productivity baseline assessment in Jordan 2022
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    Jordan is one of the most water scarce countries in the world. Jordan covers an area of about 89 000 km2 with a mostly Mediterranean climate (arid to semi-arid), with three main climatic and geographic zones: the highlands, Jordan Valley, and the eastern desert. The highlands extend from the northern to the southern part of the country and separate the Jordan Valley from the desert. The northern and central parts of the highlands are characterized by a hot dry summer and a cold wet winter, receiving the highest amounts of precipitation in the country. The Jordan Valley extends along the western part of the country and is the most fertile area in Jordan. The climate is arid with a hot dry summer, a warm winter and an average precipitation of less than 200 mm per year. Agriculture consumes around 52 percent of the water withdrawn in the country. While the demand on water is continuously increasing and exceeding the available supply, it is necessary to add always more value to any drop of water. This could be achieved through assessing and improving water productivity. Water productivity is broadly defined as the ratio of the outputs obtained from crops to the amount of water used to produce those outputs.
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    Project
    Farmer field schools on land and water management in Africa
    Proceedings of an international workshop in Jinja, Uganda, 24–29 April 2006
    2008
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    As this book shows, farmer field schools have proven to be a very useful approach for helping African farmers to improve how they manage their land and water. Numerous projects throughout Africa have shown that they result in improved soils, better yields and higher incomes for farmers. The document summarizes some of these experiences, points out successes, and – equally important – shows constraints and gaps that need to be addressed. Particularly important is the list of policy reco mmendations: committed support and funding from governments is vital if this promising approach to agricultural development is to make the difficult jump from the donor-supported project into an accepted mainstream approach applied by research and extension agencies throughout the continent.

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