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Incentivizing sustainable wood energy in sub-Saharan Africa a way forward for policy-makers










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    Book (stand-alone)
    What woodfuels can do to mitigate climate change 2010
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    Climate change can be mitigated in several ways, but most strategies emphasize reducing greenhouse gas emissions by reducing energy use and switching to energy sources that are less carbon intensive than fossil fuels. This publication explores the scope, potential and implications for using woodfuels to replace fossil fuels and thereby contribute to climate change mitigation. It analyses the current woodfuel offset mechanisms in place and their relative emission reduction potenti als. The scope is limited to solid woodfuels (fuelwood, charcoal, prepared biomass such as woodchips and pellets, and recovered products or residues from wood processing industries). However, some themes covered will be applicable to all woodfuels, notably the socio-economic and environmental impacts, financing options and overall development implications of more intensive and efficient use of woodfuels. The publication will be of interest to specialists and policy-makers in fo restry, climate change and renewable energy, as well as to forest managers, students and general audiences interested in learning more about the role of forests in energy production and the resulting mitigation potential.
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    Woodfuel supply and energy demand assessment for Borno State, Nigeria (2013–2018)
    Assessing changes in woodfuel availability and multi-sectoral challenges associated with woodfuel in displacement settings
    2019
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    Globally, the number of conflicts is increasing which is the main cause of much of the recent deterioration of the global food security situation.  This situation is exacerbated by climate related shocks. Since 2009, a combination of man-made and natural disasters has disrupted livelihoods, threatened food security and forcibly displaced millions of people in northeast Nigeria. The conflict, in northeast Nigeria, takes on a central role in the ongoing food crisis by severely curtailing the ability of populations to access land and other natural resources such as woodfuel, the central object of this analysis. Access to energy is a precondition to food security, both are often highly constrained during crises. The ways in which energy is produced and used, can aggravate the vulnerability of populations to a number of risks and challenges by exposing them to malnutrition and other health conditions, reduced resilience to natural hazards and to environmental degradation, a disproportionate work burden for women, protection risks, conflicts and unsustainable livelihood activities. FAO, UNHCR and WFP have been promoting the multi-sectoral Safe Access to Fuel and Energy approach (SAFE) in the context of forced displacement to support an effective response and to contribute to building the resilience of vulnerable populations. The starting point of such a response in northeast Nigeria is this woodfuel supply and energy demand assessment, which provides a baseline for designing comprehensive interventions that take into account the energy needs of affected populations. The desired outcome of the SAFE approach is to “satisfy the fuel and energy needs for cooking, heating, lighting, and powering in a safe and sustainable manner, without fear or risk to health, well-being, and personal security of crisis affected populations”. The SAFE approach could make an effective and significant contribution to improve food security and nutrition, and ensure the sustainable management of natural resources. In addition, it will positively affect livelihoods, women and youth empowerment, protection and health risks. By taking adequate climate change mitigation and adaptation measures, the SAFE approach will also help to increase the resilience of vulnerable populations in the face of natural hazards and disasters, and contribute to peaceful coexistence between IDPs and local communities.
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    Criteria and indicators for sustainable woodfuels 2010
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    Reliable, secure and safe energy sources are fundamental to the well-being and social and economic development of all societies. With growing pressure on energy resources and a heavy dependence on non-renewable fossil fuels, the world faces two key energy-related problems: the lack of a secure and affordable supply, and the threat of overconsumption leading to irreversible environmental damage. As part of the solution to these problems, many countries are looking increasingly to their biomass-en ergy resources. This publication focuses on one major source of biomass energy – woodfuels. In many developing countries, woodfuels are still commonly used for household cooking and heating and are also important for local processing industries. In many developed countries, wood-processing industries often use their wood by-products for energy production. In some countries, notably the Nordic countries, forest residues are increasingly used for industrial-scale electricity generation and heating . Several developing countries have enormous potential to produce energy from forests and trees outside forests, for both domestic use and export. However this potential is not often properly reflected in national energy-development strategies. This publication sets out principles, criteria and indicators to guide the sustainable use of woodfuel resources and the sustainable production of charcoal. It is designed to help policy- and decision-makers in forestry, energy and environment agencies, n on-governmental and other civil-society organizations and the private sector ensure that the woodfuel sector reaches its full potential as an agent of sustainable development.

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