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Forest and Farm Facility









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    Mid-term evaluation of the Forest and Farm Facility programme 2016
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    This report is a mid-term evaluation (MTE) of the Forest and Farm Facility (FFF), one of the first “umbrella programmes” within the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO). In support of the programme vision, “Smallholders, communities and indigenous peoples’ organizations have improved their livelihoods and decision-making over forest and farm landscapes”, FFF activities were organized under three working areas or pillars: i) Strengthen smallholder, women, community and in digenous peoples’ producer organizations for business/livelihoods and policy engagement; ii) Catalyze multi-sectoral stakeholder policy platforms with governments at local and country levels; iii) Link local voices and learning to global processes through communication and information dissemination.
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    Document
    Mid-term evaluation of the Forest and Farm Facility programme: Country Case Reports 2016
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    This report is a mid-term evaluation (MTE) of the Forest and Farm Facility (FFF), one of the first “umbrella programmes” within the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO). In support of the programme vision, “Smallholders, communities and indigenous peoples’ organizations have improved their livelihoods and decision-making over forest and farm landscapes”, FFF activities were organized under three working areas or pillars: i) Strengthen smallholder, women, community and in digenous peoples’ producer organizations for business/livelihoods and policy engagement; ii) Catalyze multi-sectoral stakeholder policy platforms with governments at local and country levels; iii) Link local voices and learning to global processes through communication and information dissemination.
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    Book (stand-alone)
    Forest business incubation
    Towards sustainable forest and farm producer organisation (FFPO) businesses that ensure climate resilient landscapes
    2018
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    Forest business incubation is a support process that accelerates the successful development of sustainable businesses in forest landscapes. There is much to develop. The aggregate gross annual value from smallholder producers within forest landscapes may be as much as US$1.3 trillion. Forest business incubation should be a key mechanism to implement the Paris Agreement on climate and the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). It can strengthen economic inclusion of forest and farm producer organisation (FFPO) businesses, increase rural incomes to reduce poverty, diversify those incomes to improve climate resilience, and incentivise forest restoration and sustainable management to mitigate climate change. It can also help improve product availability for established businesses and customers, pool lower-risk investment opportunities for financiers, and help inform policymakers on how best to deliver a win-win-win for the economy, society and the environment. It is that important! Business incubation practice generally has expanded rapidly in recent years. Since the first recorded business incubator was founded in 1959, establishment has risen sharply to more than 7,000 today – primarily in urban centres. They are variably financed through client fees, other business income, public and private grants, and loans. Over time the concept has evolved from primarily one of shared space (first generation) to shared space and mentoring (second generation) to shared space, mentoring and networking (third generation). Business incubators respond to needs that especially occur in newer business such as the lack of premises, facilities, market information, technological knowledge, business-management experience, procedures, finance and legitimacy. Remote forest landscapes present challenges for business incubation. Beyond exacerbating basic business support needs, such landscapes offer low densities of educated entrepreneurs, high logistical costs, scarce infrastructure to differentiate products, and few capable business mentors. These challenges may explain the limited penetration of business incubation thinking into forest landscapes. Forest landscapes also require a different type of service delivery model, because shared space is not often practical, requiring much more attention to on-site client visits, virtual services and field exchanges. The content of this book seeks to show how such challenges can be overcome. Chapter 1 begins by defining and introducing ‘business incubation’ and explaining why forest business incubation might be so important. It also specifies why forest business incubation is so challengingly different from models of urban business incubation. In the subsequent Chapters 2–12, detailed case studies are presented of attempts to deliver business incubation services in forest landscapes. Each case study introduces the incubator and its context, describes its institutional design, details the services it offers, outlines how the incubator-client engagement process is managed, comments on how impact is measured, and concludes with some thoughts and tips on best practice.

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