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FAO Investment Centre Environmental Report Series N. 2

Incentive Systems for Natural Resources Management: Role of Indirect Incentives, FAO Investment Centre-IFAD, 1999









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    Book (stand-alone)
    FAO Investment Centre Environmental Report Series N. 1
    Kenya: Aberdares Natural Resources Development Project, Environmental Impact Assessment Report, FAO Investment Centre-African Development Bank, 1997
    1998
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    FAO Investment Centre environmental reports are directed to environment and natural resources specialists. They address environmental issues associated with the formulation of investment projects for the agricultural/rural sector. This report describes an environmental assessment that contributed to improvements in the project design for the Aberdares Natural Resources Development Project in Kenya. The objective of this six-year project was to conserve and develop the natural resources of the Ab erdares region based on an integrated management approach involving local communities. Project preparation was done by the FAO Investment Centre in 1995 and appraisal took place in 1997 in parallel with the preparation of the environmental assessment by a multi-disciplinary team led by Centre staff. The major project investment consisted of the construction of some 360-km of fencing that would encircle the entire Aberdares park perimeter with the aim of reducing human-wildlife conflicts. The tea m examined three project scenarios: without project, with project and modified project. One of the key conclusions of the team was that as proposed the fence was not viable; a conclusion based on both economic and environmental considerations. Rather, replacing the fence with a mixed barrier and non-barrier system (e.g. game moats and topographic barriers) would improve the project. In addition, the mission recommended the completion of a comprehensive management plan prior to initiating any inv estment activities. The recommendations were accepted by the African Development Bank and the Government of Kenya and contributed to significant improvements in project design.
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    What does it take? The role of incentives in forest plantation development in Asia and the Pacific 2004
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    Over the past two decades, political developments as well as macro-economic and extra-sectoral policies have affected the forests of Asia and the Pacific to an unprecedented extent, resulting in deforestation and forest degradation. Responding to the diminishing capacity of the region's natural forests to produce timber, many countries have turned to forest plantations. Governments and their respective forest agencies are asking what it takes to encourage non-government entities to grow trees. Y et little is known about the role that direct and indirect incentives have in influencing plantation development. This publication helps fill this knowledge gap by examining how incentives influence plantation development through a series of country case studies in the region. The overall picture that emerges is sufficiently coherent to outline a set of guiding principles to help policy-makers and forest managers better understand the key issues, challenges and opportunities concerning private i nvestment in forest plantation development.
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    Assessment of Forest Resource Degradation and Intervention Options in Refugee-Hosting Areas of Western and Southwestern Uganda 2020
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    Uganda is currently hosting over 1.3 million refugees making it the largest refugee host country in Africa. The inflow of refugees is reported to have exacerbated a range of ongoing environmental impacts and associated challenges, including land degradation and woodland loss, resulting in inadequate access to energy for cooking and competition with local people for water and other natural resources. Supporting more sustainable use of those resources, especially forests and other woodlands, could help address environmental degradation and improve energy access. Building on a 2018 assessment of natural resource degradation in the refugee-hosting areas of northern Uganda, FAO, in collaboration with the World Bank and the Government of Uganda, has undertaken a follow-on assessment of forest resource degradation in the refugee hosting areas in the west and southwest of the country. The study identifies potential intervention options to mitigate pressure on forest resources, restore degraded land, enhance sustainable woodfuel supply and contribute to resilience-building of both the displaced and host communities. The findings of this study will add to the evidence base for the World Bank/Government of Uganda (GoU) investment package ‘Investing in Forests and Protected Areas for Climate-smart Development project’, to be supported under the Refugee Sub-Window of the International Development Association’s 18th and 19th funding rounds. It is envisaged that the study findings will also guide the support of different development partners for programming energy and environment interventions in the forced displacement context.

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