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Climate change mitigation and harvested wood products: Lessons learned from three case studies in Asia and the Pacific










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    Evaluation of carbon stocks of domestic wood products to improve carbon sinks in the forest sector
    XV World Forestry Congress, 2-6 May 2022
    2022
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    Harvested Wood Products (HWP) is recognized as a carbon pool in the forest sector, along with biomass, dead wood, litter and soil. There was a debate about which country should include carbon stocks in imported or exported HWP. At the 17th Conference of the Parties in Durban (COP17) in 2011, domestic harvested wood products were accepted as accounted carbon pools and thus have to be reported by all Parties included in Annex I. Although the HWP carbon calculation method related to this has been suggested since the IPCC 2006 guidelines, it could not be calculated due to the lack of HWP statistics data in Korea.
    In this study, to estimate the carbon stock and the annual stock changes for each of the HWP categories. Input data on the production of wood products used in the model to estimate carbon emissions and removals from HWP in Korea were acquired from database of the 'Wood utilization survey report' and 'Statistical yearbook of Forestry' in Korea Forest Service. In particular, statistic data on production of sawnwood, wood-based panels and paper and paperboard were obtained for the period 1989–2019. It used the first order decay function with default half-lives of 35, 25 and two years, respectively. For the conversion of wood volume or weight into carbon the default conversion factors and half-lives provided by IPCC guideline. As a result of the calculation, it was estimated that about 0.7 million tCO2 was stored according to the use of domestic wood products in 2019. It is expected that it will be possible to quantify the carbon storage effect of HWP and to activate the use of wood products. Indeed, it could change if life expectancy of HWPs improves into the future. Furthermore, additional mitigation potential may be achieved when substituting emissions-intensive materials. Keywords: Sustainable forest management, Climate change, Value chain ID: 3619351
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    Carbon storage accounting in Brazilian harvested wood products
    XV World Forestry Congress, 2-6 May 2022
    2022
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    Brazil is one of the world's leading manufacturers of forest products, and 94% of the raw material comes from cultivated forests, mainly of the Pinus and Eucalyptus genera. Harvested wood products (HWP) can be an important carbon pool, based on the estimated carbon stored in the products in use. Thus, as of 2006, the IPCC began to allow the inclusion of these estimates in national inventories of greenhouse gas emissions. However, Brazil only started to consider these removals and carbon emissions by HWP in the 2020 version of the inventory (base year 2016). The primary data of forest production used in this study were obtained from the database of FAO (FAOSTAT) and of IBGE (Brazilian Institute of Geography and Statistics). Only products manufactured with raw material from planted forests were considered. The methodology for calculating the emission and removal of carbon dioxide followed the IPCC guidelines defined in 2006. Three groups of products were considered: sawnwood; wood-based panels; and paper and cardboard. Of the three approaches commonly used to estimate carbon absorption and emission, the most advantageous calculation was the atmospheric flow method, which is based on carbon fluxes rather than stock changes. This approach benefits major wood products exporting countries, such as Brazil. To calculate the estimates, production in the last year (2016) of 13.4 million m3 of sawnwood, 9.63 million m3 of wood panels and 10.3 million tons of paper and cardboard were considered. The estimates obtained indicate that, in 2016 (considering the period 1990-2016), the annual net contribution of forest products estimated by the atmospheric flow approach was the removal of - 50,772 Gg of CO2eq. This removal corresponds to about 3.5% of Brazil's total emissions and 12.8% of LULUCF (Land Use, Land-Use Change and Forestry) activities emissions. Keywords: Climate change, Monitoring and data collection ID: 3622194
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    How Brazilian Tree Industry can help complying with climate change agenda linked to Sustainable Development Goals, Global Forest Goals and Brazilian NDC under Paris Agreement
    XV World Forestry Congress, 2-6 May 2022
    2022
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    The Brazilian Tree Industry (Ibá) is the association responsible for institutionally representing the planted tree production chain with its main stakeholders. Ibá represents 50 companies and 9 state entities for products originating from planted trees, most notably wood panels, laminate flooring, pulp, paper, charcoal steel industry and biomass, as well as independent producers and financial investors which together contribute with 7% of Brazil’s industrial Gross Domestic Product. The sector holds 9 million hectares of planted trees and 5.9 million hectares for conservation.
    The Brazilian NDC aiming at reducing GHG emissions in 37%by 2025 and 43% by 2030. Such an ambitious goal will demand, according to the Government, the restoration of 12 million hectares of forest, achieve zero illegal deforestation in Amazonia, attain 45% of renewable energy and 18% of bioenergy and ensure compliance with the Forest Code.
    This industry has a substantial contribution to several Global Forest Goals of UNFF and SDGs from Agenda 2030, in terms of adaptation and mitigation of climate change. Regardless the goal and governance related, both in national or international level, Brazilian planted-tree sector plays an important role and this paper aims to show how.
    As a brief the sector is now monitoring dozens and reporting 17 KPIs on water management; 89% of the energy is renewable and 67% is produced in-house; 67% of paper is recycled, 4.48 billion tons of CO2e is stored in almost 15 million hectares of forests for commercial and conservation purposes. At steel industry, each ton of pig iron produced with charcoal coming from planted forest as a substitution from coal, avoids the issue of 1.8 ton CO2eq. At civil construction, the use of wood stocks 0.5 on of CO2e per square meter of construction, compared to the use of conventional materials. The carbon removed from atmosphere is fixed in the biomass that will become products and can store from 45% up to 85% of the mass products. Keywords: Climate change, Adaptive and integrated management, Economic Development ID: 3487149

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