Thumbnail Image

GIAHS in East Africa – Project Summary

Globally Important Agricultural Heritage Systems (GIAHS)








Also available in:
No results found.

Related items

Showing items related by metadata.

  • Thumbnail Image
    Project
    Siwa Oasis, Egypt. Proposal for Declaration as a Globally Important Agricultural Heritage System (GIAHS)
    Globally Important Agricultural Heritage Systems (GIAHS)
    2016
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    This document proposes to recognize and designate Siwa oasis in the northwestern Desert of Egypt as a Globally Important Agricultural Heritage Site (GIAHS) under the respective FAO program. Siwa is a globally significant in situ repository of plant genetic resources, especially of uniquely adapted varieties of date palm, olive and secondary crops that are highly esteemed for their quality and continue to play a significant role in rural livelihoods, both for nutrition and income. Situated in a r emote region of the Sahara, and surrounded by breathtaking desert landscapes, Siwa oasis is distinguished by a range of archaeological treasures that testify to the long history of the oasis at the crossroads of ancient trade routes, going back to Pharaonic and Ptolemaic epochs. Its long isolation from outside influences, a population tracing its origin to Berber civilization and speaking an indigenous language, and environmental constraints have given Siwa a unique local culture embodied by its mud-salt brick architecture, peculiar social institutions and a rich heritage of handicrafts. Challenges to oasis agriculture, biodiversity and cultural identity are currently effectively addressed by a number of national and local initiatives, including sustainable agricultural practices, improved irrigation management, the protection of wildlife in and around the oasis as well as sustainable tourism.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Document
    Concept Note and draft programme. GIAHS Dialog: International Forum on Globally Important Agricultural Heritage Systems 29 May - 1 June 2013
    Globally Important Agricultural Heritage Systems (GIAHS)
    2013
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    International GIAHS seminar. Stakeholders Dialog with Dr. Parviz Koohafkan, GIAHS Global Coordinator. Around the world a myriad of family and community managed agricultural systems can be found that are part of humanity’s common heritage. Over centuries, generations of farmers and herders have developed complex, diverse and locally adapted agricultural systems, managed with time-tested, ingenious combinations of techniques and practices that lead to biodiversity conservation, food security, resi lience of ecosystems and their provision of essential goods and services for humanity. The High Level Session of the GIAHS Forum 2013 will discuss and provide its public with a better understanding of the agricultural heritage concept and raise awareness about evolving traditional systems and sustainable management of natural resources that contribute to world food security.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Project
    Proposal from the United Arab Emirates For the designation under the GIAHS Program of Al Ain and Liwa Historical Date Palm Oases
    Globally Important Agricultural Heritage Systems (GIAHS)
    2015
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    This document proposes to designate Al Ain and Liwa date palm oases as a Globally Important Agricultural Heritage Site (GIAHS) under the respective FAO programme. Al Ain and Liwa constitute globally significant in situ repositories of date palm genetic resources, and are home to ancient falaj irrigation systems, which bear testimony to human agricultural and technological ingenuity, with important lessons for future coping strategies and sustainable development in the face of climate change. Loc ated in a country, which has experienced extreme rapid development and undergone dramatic socio-economic change, the oases no longer have their traditional significance in subsistence agriculture. However, their iconic importance to the United Arab Emirates’ cultural identity and traditions, and the environmental quality they add to Al Ain and Liwa City as well as their role in national branding and sustainable tourism, cannot be overstated. A very active and dynamic conservation program, seekin g to revitalize the oases through a variety of measures, such as protection against urban encroachment, restoration of aflaj irrigation systems, and re-introduction of traditional agricultural management, is fully supported by state-of-the-art development plans, legislative initiatives, academic research and the highest level of Abu Dhabi’s government.

Users also downloaded

Showing related downloaded files

No results found.