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Angola and FAO

Partnering for sustainable rural development









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    Book (stand-alone)
    Special Report Angola- July 2006 2006
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    • Rainfall was the main determinant for Angola’s crop production in 2005/06, with much of the country experiencing excessive rains and/or longer dry spells than usual. • With the recent re-settlement trend in former agricultural areas, there was a small increase in land under cultivation compared with 2004/05, but crop yields were generally lower as a result of poor rainfall distribution. • Production of 2006 maize, the dominant cereal crop, is estimated at 579 000 tonnes, a reduction of ov er 20 percent from the previous year’s record harvest. Total cereal production is estimated at 742 000 tonnes, down 15.5 percent on last year but up 7 percent on the average of the previous five years. A drop of about one-third in cereal production is estimated in the most affected central provinces of the country. • It is expected that there will be a cereal import requirement of about 843 000 tonnes for marketing year 2006/07 (April/March), including about 217 000 tonnes of maize. Accounting for commercial imports estimated at 776 000 tonnes, there remains a net cereal deficit of about 67 000 tonnes. • The supply of cassava in the north of the country is plentiful. Cassava flour is generally available in most local markets; however, it is not widely traded throughout the country. • Livestock condition is good; pasture and access to water were problems in the areas where dry spells were experienced (in the south and centre), but became satisfactory following heavy rains in March and April. • Despite much progress made over the past few years, some households of refugees and IDPs have not established food security. They add to the number of vulnerable groups, including some female-headed households, and the sick and elderly. • Approximately 800 000 persons will require some assistance - food and non-food - until the next harvest in May 2007. This is about 71 percent of those determined to require assistance in 2004 and 42 percent of the number for 2003.
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    Document
    Plan of Action for North Sudan. Emergency response and rehabilitation for food and agriculture August 2010 – August 2012 2010
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    After decades of civil conflict and associated political instability, populations throughout North Sudan have seen their livelihoods and production capacity eroded and their ability to cope with human-induced and recurrent natural disasters (floods, droughts, outbreaks of livestock diseases) worn away. There have been considerable efforts to respond to the protracted crisis, with the international humanitarian response reaching USD 1.3 billion in 2009. Despite this, millions of people continue t o face severe and chronic food insecurity. With between 60 and 80 percent of the working-age population relying on agriculture to meet their food and income needs, the sector’s importance to economic recovery and the consolidation of peace in North Sudan cannot be underestimated. In this Plan of Action (PoA), the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) outlines its emergency and rehabilitation programme for North Sudan in 2010–12. It does not include FAO’s long-term develop ment programme, but is designed to complement the Organization’s ongoing development activities, as well as the interventions of United Nations agencies, Government and other partners which aim to mitigate the effects of recurrent crises while addressing their root causes. The programme relies heavily on a disaster risk management approach to the complex situation in North Sudan. This approach focuses on emergency relief, such as replacing lost assets or restoring livelihoods, as well as on earl y efforts as part of risk reduction that protect and sustain livelihoods. Such interventions can often be more effective than those delayed until people are in crisis. Given the complex and protracted nature of the crisis in North Sudan, FAO’s relief and recovery programming is enhanced by interventions that not only restore, but also protect and promote livelihoods in food and agriculture. Thus, the overall purpose of the PoA for North Sudan is to improve preparedness and to make short-term res ponses in food and agriculture more effective. The proposed priorities in this PoA will help FAO, its counterparts and partners to meet shortterm needs in ways that strengthen the resilience of communities and lead to more effective and longer-term recovery. The approach is reflected in the six key areas of focus as proposed in this PoA, based on an analysis of the current situation, the main factors triggering food insecurity and assessments identifying and targeting vulnerable groups. These ar e: (i) dwindling agricultural production; (ii) reduced livestock production and productivity; (iii) the adverse effect of climate change and the conflicts created over the use of scarce natural resources and longer-term issues such as land access; (iv) economic factors that affect the livelihoods of the various groups, as well as the creation of alternative livelihood resources; (v) the need for institutional strengthening; and (vi) coordination of the international community and the assistance provided. The above priorities have been expanded into twelve sectoral programmes that detail activities to be implemented by FAO in North Sudan to achieve expected outcomes and address the specific needs identified in three regions: (i) Greater Darfur (comprising North, South and West Darfur); (ii) the Transitional Areas (Abyei, Blue Nile and Southern Kordofan); and (iii) Eastern Sudan (Gedaref, Kassala and Red Sea states). The total budget for the PoA 2010–2012 is USD 45 056 468. The PoA signa ls FAO’s adoption of a more programmatic approach in its emergency and rehabilitation activities in North Sudan. The document has used a programme cycle management approach to present the situation analysis, planned response and monitoring and evaluation framework. Through this PoA and other efforts, FAO is attempting to build greater programmatic coherence with internal and external partners, in line with national food security plans and related strategy and United Nations system programming fr amework. Fundamentally, this PoA is a dynamic programming tool that may need to be adjusted, according to contingency plans, when and as the food security situation evolves in North Sudan.
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    Brochure, flyer, fact-sheet
    Angola e a FAO
    Parceria para a resiliência e o desenvolvimento rural sustentável
    2018
    Also available in:

    Angola e a FAO envolveram-se numa estreita cooperação desde que o país aderiu à Organização em 1977. Devido à Guerra civil de 27 anos, as primeiras intervenções da FAO concentraram-se na assistência de emergência, incluindo o reassentamento das famílias rurais vulneráveis e o fornecimento de insumos agrícolas para a rápida retomada da produção de alimentos. Houve desde então uma mudança em direcção à recuperação e a metas de desenvolvimento de longo prazo, incluindo assistência na formulação e implementação de projectos em linha com as políticas e programas do Governo. Em 1982, foi instalada a Representação da FAO no país.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Book (stand-alone)
    Special Report Angola- July 2006 2006
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    • Rainfall was the main determinant for Angola’s crop production in 2005/06, with much of the country experiencing excessive rains and/or longer dry spells than usual. • With the recent re-settlement trend in former agricultural areas, there was a small increase in land under cultivation compared with 2004/05, but crop yields were generally lower as a result of poor rainfall distribution. • Production of 2006 maize, the dominant cereal crop, is estimated at 579 000 tonnes, a reduction of ov er 20 percent from the previous year’s record harvest. Total cereal production is estimated at 742 000 tonnes, down 15.5 percent on last year but up 7 percent on the average of the previous five years. A drop of about one-third in cereal production is estimated in the most affected central provinces of the country. • It is expected that there will be a cereal import requirement of about 843 000 tonnes for marketing year 2006/07 (April/March), including about 217 000 tonnes of maize. Accounting for commercial imports estimated at 776 000 tonnes, there remains a net cereal deficit of about 67 000 tonnes. • The supply of cassava in the north of the country is plentiful. Cassava flour is generally available in most local markets; however, it is not widely traded throughout the country. • Livestock condition is good; pasture and access to water were problems in the areas where dry spells were experienced (in the south and centre), but became satisfactory following heavy rains in March and April. • Despite much progress made over the past few years, some households of refugees and IDPs have not established food security. They add to the number of vulnerable groups, including some female-headed households, and the sick and elderly. • Approximately 800 000 persons will require some assistance - food and non-food - until the next harvest in May 2007. This is about 71 percent of those determined to require assistance in 2004 and 42 percent of the number for 2003.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Document
    Plan of Action for North Sudan. Emergency response and rehabilitation for food and agriculture August 2010 – August 2012 2010
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    After decades of civil conflict and associated political instability, populations throughout North Sudan have seen their livelihoods and production capacity eroded and their ability to cope with human-induced and recurrent natural disasters (floods, droughts, outbreaks of livestock diseases) worn away. There have been considerable efforts to respond to the protracted crisis, with the international humanitarian response reaching USD 1.3 billion in 2009. Despite this, millions of people continue t o face severe and chronic food insecurity. With between 60 and 80 percent of the working-age population relying on agriculture to meet their food and income needs, the sector’s importance to economic recovery and the consolidation of peace in North Sudan cannot be underestimated. In this Plan of Action (PoA), the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) outlines its emergency and rehabilitation programme for North Sudan in 2010–12. It does not include FAO’s long-term develop ment programme, but is designed to complement the Organization’s ongoing development activities, as well as the interventions of United Nations agencies, Government and other partners which aim to mitigate the effects of recurrent crises while addressing their root causes. The programme relies heavily on a disaster risk management approach to the complex situation in North Sudan. This approach focuses on emergency relief, such as replacing lost assets or restoring livelihoods, as well as on earl y efforts as part of risk reduction that protect and sustain livelihoods. Such interventions can often be more effective than those delayed until people are in crisis. Given the complex and protracted nature of the crisis in North Sudan, FAO’s relief and recovery programming is enhanced by interventions that not only restore, but also protect and promote livelihoods in food and agriculture. Thus, the overall purpose of the PoA for North Sudan is to improve preparedness and to make short-term res ponses in food and agriculture more effective. The proposed priorities in this PoA will help FAO, its counterparts and partners to meet shortterm needs in ways that strengthen the resilience of communities and lead to more effective and longer-term recovery. The approach is reflected in the six key areas of focus as proposed in this PoA, based on an analysis of the current situation, the main factors triggering food insecurity and assessments identifying and targeting vulnerable groups. These ar e: (i) dwindling agricultural production; (ii) reduced livestock production and productivity; (iii) the adverse effect of climate change and the conflicts created over the use of scarce natural resources and longer-term issues such as land access; (iv) economic factors that affect the livelihoods of the various groups, as well as the creation of alternative livelihood resources; (v) the need for institutional strengthening; and (vi) coordination of the international community and the assistance provided. The above priorities have been expanded into twelve sectoral programmes that detail activities to be implemented by FAO in North Sudan to achieve expected outcomes and address the specific needs identified in three regions: (i) Greater Darfur (comprising North, South and West Darfur); (ii) the Transitional Areas (Abyei, Blue Nile and Southern Kordofan); and (iii) Eastern Sudan (Gedaref, Kassala and Red Sea states). The total budget for the PoA 2010–2012 is USD 45 056 468. The PoA signa ls FAO’s adoption of a more programmatic approach in its emergency and rehabilitation activities in North Sudan. The document has used a programme cycle management approach to present the situation analysis, planned response and monitoring and evaluation framework. Through this PoA and other efforts, FAO is attempting to build greater programmatic coherence with internal and external partners, in line with national food security plans and related strategy and United Nations system programming fr amework. Fundamentally, this PoA is a dynamic programming tool that may need to be adjusted, according to contingency plans, when and as the food security situation evolves in North Sudan.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Brochure, flyer, fact-sheet
    Angola e a FAO
    Parceria para a resiliência e o desenvolvimento rural sustentável
    2018
    Also available in:

    Angola e a FAO envolveram-se numa estreita cooperação desde que o país aderiu à Organização em 1977. Devido à Guerra civil de 27 anos, as primeiras intervenções da FAO concentraram-se na assistência de emergência, incluindo o reassentamento das famílias rurais vulneráveis e o fornecimento de insumos agrícolas para a rápida retomada da produção de alimentos. Houve desde então uma mudança em direcção à recuperação e a metas de desenvolvimento de longo prazo, incluindo assistência na formulação e implementação de projectos em linha com as políticas e programas do Governo. Em 1982, foi instalada a Representação da FAO no país.

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