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The role of digital sequence information in the conservation and sustainable use of genetic resources for food and agriculture: opportunities and challenges










Smith, D., Ryan, M.J. & Buddie, A.G. 2023. The role of digital sequence information in the conservation and sustainable use of genetic resources for food and agriculture: opportunities and challenges. Background Study Paper, No. 73. Commission on Genetic Resources for Food and Agriculture. Rome, FAO. 




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