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An innovative construction system made from local Mediterranean natural resources

XV World Forestry Congress, 2-6 May 2022









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    Article
    Community-led place-based mangrove ecosystems conservation in West Mexico
    XV World Forestry Congress, 2-6 May 2022
    2022
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    Mangroves are biodiversity- and carbon-rich socio-ecological ecosystems that provide essential goods and services to millions of people. In particular, food, medicine, and wood, which is the primary source of energy and construction material for several Indigenous Peoples and Local Communities (IPLCs) living in coastal areas. Mangrove loss and degradation occur at alarming rates putting at risk the traditional livelihoods of IPLCs. Community-led mangrove conservation could be a cost-effective solution to conserve mangrove forests, their ecosystem services, and biological diversity within and beyond protected areas. Although community-based mangrove conservation is a common practice, few successful case studies are known. In West Mexico, IPLCs have been conserving and managing mangrove ecosystems for decades to produce mangrove wood for both domestic and commercial purposes. Through participatory planning, zones have been designated for conservation, wood production, water bodies protection, and restoration. Historical mangrove cover change analysis for the periods 1970/1980, 2005 and 2010 revealed forest expansion within the community-led conserved area (UMA), including in wood production zones. West Mexico is a unique case study that could provide valuable mangrove conservation best practices and lessons learned to other communities around the world. This community-based conservation strategy may contribute to achieving national and international environmental and biodiversity targets by providing multiple socio-ecological and economic benefits from local to global scales if implemented with a rights-based conservation perspective that incorporates multidisciplinary and participatory scientific assessments and traditional knowledge. It could also enhance sustainable local traditional livelihoods and biocultural practices while reducing illegal logging and contributing to mitigating the effects of climate change and biodiversity loss through nature-based solutions. Keywords: Rights-based Conservation; Sustainable Livelihoods; Community-based Decision-making;Mangroves; Community-led Nature-based Solutions ID: 3487429
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    Book (stand-alone)
    Sustainable management of Miombo woodlands
    Food security, nutrition and wood energy
    2018
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    The Miombo woodland is a vast African dryland forest ecosystem covering close to 2.7 million km2 across southern Africa (Angola, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Malawi, Mozambique, Tanzania, Zambia and Zimbabwe). The woodlands are characterized by the dominance of Brachystegia species, either alone or in association with Julbernardia and Isoberlinia species. It is estimated that the woodlands – through their numerous goods and services which include various non-wood forest products (NWFPs) (e.g. insects, mushrooms, fruits, tubers, medicine, fodder, honey, seeds) and woodfuels, which, for simplicity, will be referred to as non-timber forest products, or NTFPs, throughout the publication – sustain the livelihoods of more than 100 million rural poor and 50 million urban people. The charcoal sector alone employs vast numbers of rural people and offers additional income to many poor rural families. Communities moreover rely directly on the woodlands for food and nutrition. NWFPs add vital micro- and macronutrients to local diets and contribute to diversified food systems, while woodfuel is essential for cooking and sterilizing, thus ensuring proper nutrient absorption and providing clean water for drinking. Forests and trees, if managed sustainably, are an important source of resilience for rural people in the Miombo woodlands, supporting households to absorb and recover from climatic or economic calamities and contributing to resolving the underlying causes of food insecurity, undernutrition and poverty by providing nutritious edible products and woodfuel for cooking in addition to conserving biodiversity and water resources, buffering extreme weather conditions and preventing land degradation and desertification. Generally speaking, it is now accepted that forests managed for both timber and NTFPs retain more biodiversity and resilience than forests managed solely for one aspect, e.g. timber and exotic timber plantations. However, a growing population in high need of agricultural land and unsustainable use and overharvesting of natural resources in parts of the Miombo woodlands, combined with climate change impacts (e.g. drought, fires), leave insufficient time for many trees and associated species to regenerate naturally, posing a serious threat to the products and services of the woodlands, and to the livelihoods depending on them. Compounding the problem and hindering development of the Miombo ecosystem, are: i) lack of an enabling policy environment; ii) unsustainable management; iii) limited willingness and ability to pay for and access to energy-efficiency technologies; iv) inadequate awareness and information, including technical capacity; v) high poverty levels; and vi) limited access to microcredit facilities. With the Committee on World Food Security’s endorsement of the recommendations presented in the High Level Panel of Experts Report on Sustainable Forestry for Food Security and Nutrition in late 2017 – which include promoting multifunctional landscapes, integrated food-forestry systems, and research on associated linkages, among other things – forests and trees are expected to play a greater role in future land-use decisions and related policies. This paper provides an overview of these linkages in the context of the Miombo woodlands, in the hope that future land use, policy decisions and financial investments are shaped to support the contributions of forests and trees to the health and livelihoods of communities in the ecoregion. The following key messages were formulated: • Forests and trees, if managed sustainably, are an important source of resilience for rural people in the Miombo woodlands, supporting households to absorb and recover from climatic or economic calamities and contributing to resolving the underlying causes of food insecurity, undernutrition and poverty by providing nutritious edible products and woodfuel for cooking in addition to conserving biodiversity and water resources, buffering extreme weather conditions and preventing land degradation and desertification. • Current data bases referring to the value of the Miombo must be analysed and used as evidence to improve policy-making. • Miombo woodlands may be dominant (spatially), but they have not been addressed as a single unit but as part of the region’s forests. They form part of the overall forestry strategies and no specific mention in the conventions does not suggest that their importance is underplayed. • The management of Miombo will require some changes in management structures, especially in providing benefits emerging from trade in forest products to local managers. • Local forest managers should play a greater role in allocating resources for feedstock for charcoal production.
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    Brochure, flyer, fact-sheet
    Forests for resilience to natural, climate and human-induced disasters and crises
    Forests and trees outside forests play important roles in protecting and supporting livelihoods and serving as vital safety nets during disasters and crises
    2019
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    Forests and trees play a significant role in supporting livelihood and when sustainably managed are vital safety nets and life-supporting assets and act as buffers that help communities to withstand extreme weather and other shocks. Forests and trees already contribute to both building resilience to threats and crises as well as resolving the underlying causes of food insecurity, undernutrition and poverty in multiple ways – by providing woodfuel for cooking, edible products, material for shelter, conserving water resources and buffering extreme weather conditions. Wood for instance is expected to remain a primary source of energy for cooking in the foreseeable future for rural people, especially in displaced populations, as alternative sources are typically associated with higher costs, and changing user behavior can be a lengthy process. When looking at how forests can contribute to increase the resilience of livelihoods to threats and crises, it is important to consider how they are managed through a landscape approach to conservation and restoration of ecosystems for disaster risk reduction (DRR). Planning and achieving a sustainable forest resource management in emergencies and protracted crises, including afforestation, reforestation and restoration interventions, provide a fundamental contribution to reduce the environmental impact, to enhance the supply of forest products, such as woodfuel, and services and respond to climate change mitigation and adaptation needs. This in turn will contribute to more durable livelihood opportunities bridging humanitarian response and longer-term development goals through a practical integrated approach.

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