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Support to Sustainable Rural and Peri-Urban Family Poultry Development - TCP/KYR/3703








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    Booklet
    Policy Brief - Indigenous livestock and poultry to alleviate under-nutrition among women and children in rural farm-households of Sri Lanka 2019
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    Malnutrition among women of reproductive age results in reduced productivity, increased susceptibility to infections, slow recovery from illness, and heightened risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes. In Sri Lanka, only 45.7 percent of women have a healthy BMI, with 45.3 percent either overweight or obese. Being underweight and overweight can impact negatively on an unborn child. The causal relationship between nutritional status and food consumption patterns is well established, including the relationship between increased consumption of animal source foods. Promoting the consumption of these foods, specifically, indigenous livestock and poultry, is one channel to improve food and nutrition security in Sri Lanka. At a household level, evidence demonstrates that indigenous livestock and poultry keepers consume more animal source foods, and contribute to food and nutrition security of the household. Furthermore, the keepers of livestock with a market orientation earn additional income from sales and thus contribute to accessibility of more nutritious food. Despite the benefits of rearing indigenous livestock, a secular decline of indigenous animals from the farming systems of Sri Lanka is evident. In this respect, this policy brief examines the benefits of livestock and poultry to alleviate malnutrition and improve the living conditions of rural small-holder farm families and provides recommendations for policy and regulatory reforms.
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    Project
    Support for Increased Access and Availability of Fresh Local Food Through Development of Urban, Peri-Urban and Backyard Gardening - TCP/STK/3601 2020
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    Saint Kitts and Nevis is a net importer of food, although a significant portion of the fresh produce currently importedby the country can be grown locally. The critical food and nutrition situation faced by the country relates to the four pillars of food and nutrition security: availability, access,consumption/utilization and stability. The developmentof sustainable food production systems and theelimination of all forms of malnutrition are the long-termgoal of the Government in this priority area. Government policy is focused on the expansion of urban and peri-urbanagriculture in order to support national social protection programmes aimed at vulnerable pockets of the population. In this context, FAO assistance was requested to increase food access and availability via urban,peri-urban and backyard garden development. The project aimed to strengthen the capacity of DOA inthe training of backyard gardeners, school teachers and students to sustainably produce short-term vegetable crops, and the capacity of backyard gardeners, school teachers and students in both sustainable crop production and the development of good eating habits. These wouldbe achieved through the establishment of two backyard demonstration gardens (BDGs) and two school demonstration gardens (SDGs), one of each in selected communities of Saint Kitts and of Nevis, respectively. In addition, backyard and school gardeners would be trainedin best practices for crop production and their awareness raised of concepts of nutrition and better eating habits.
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    Project
    Socio-economics and Gender in Aquaculture 1998
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    The gender and socio-economic roles of men and women in different forms of Lao aquaculture (pond, rice-cum-fish, mini-hatchery) have not been widely investigated. This socio-economic and gender analysis study of Lao aquaculture was conducted in five Lao provinces within the scope of the UNDP/FAO project Lao/97/007. The Lao PDR population is predominantly involved in agricultural activities and increasing food security and income levels of poorer farmers of all ethnic groups are key priorities. T he rural Lao PDR population depend primarily on rice cultivation coupled to a wide variety of other agricultural (pigs, poultry, buffalo etc) and wild food foraging activities for their food security. Both captured and cultivated fish is widely consumed and commands a premium price in markets. Easy access to fish for the family is one of the main reasons for both women's and men's interest in raising fish in Lao PDR. It is considered that there is a potential for increasing the scale and efficie ncy of aquaculture activities in Lao PDR. However, in most rural areas visited in Lao PDR during the study, aquaculture is considered as a side activity integrated with other agricultural activities. There are good opportunities to further integrate aquaculture into existing agricultural livelihood systems. The majority of men and women fish farmers interviewed conducted aquaculture primarily for household food security, with income generation as an added bonus only where surplus fish were produced. Fish production for food security is considered to require low labour intensity once established. There are high levels of interest among women farmers towards aquaculture. However there are high labour and financial entry costs for pond based aquaculture, which only some farmers may be able to sustain. Income generation from fish production may also incur higher labour demand. Both women and men are involved in aquaculture, although each may have different roles at different st ages of the fish production cycle. There are few cultural constraints to women's participation in most aquaculture activities. In Lao PDR men select the site for pond construction and as heads of households are regarded as owners of ponds. While men often make the major decisions concerning the production system, the production from ponds also depends on the time and effort allocated by women and children for pond management and for feeding of the fish. Men are responsible for harvesting the ove rall yield; women are often responsible for harvesting fish for household consumption. Women control the cash income from the selling of fish at the pond site and in the market, although consultation with their husbands on household expenditure is common. Income distribution within the household is relatively equitable, so income generated from aquaculture is likely to benefit entire households. Older women (over 40) may be more suitable for involvement in aquaculture activities. Only experience d (e.g. > 3 years) and relatively better off men and women farmers are likely to be able to engage in mini-hatchery enterprises.

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