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Jordan food security update

Implications of COVID-19, May – June 2020










WB, FAO, IFAD and WFP. 2020. Jordan Food Security Update Implications of COVID-19: May – June 2020. Washington, D.C.

 



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    Booklet
    Jordan food security update
    Implications of COVID-19, July–August 2020
    2021
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    With the COVID-19 in Jordan under control, the government of Jordan has managed the response proactively and to mitigate potential immediate impacts on the availability of food to the population. Food security among vulnerable Jordanian households has remained largely stable as yet with 15% of households showing a poor or borderline Food Consumption Score (FCS) in 2020 compared to 16% in 2018. Nevertheless the extent of the damage to key components of the food supply chain is still not completely quantified. Also, the pandemic still ongoing globally and in the region, Jordan will have to remain attentive to multiple risks that could have adverse effects on the national food security. While the government has been active to ensure on a short-term basis adequate food availability and access through support of well-functioning food supply chains, key risks remain. While Jordan has instituted price controls, food consumer price indices indicated slight increases in certain items including vegetables, legumes and meat over the course of the lockdown. Jordan needs to continue to monitor its food prices for consumers and pay particular attention to food availability and financial accessibility for the most vulnerable, including poor and vulnerable Jordanian households (who lost their income sources) and a large population of refugees. The full impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on Jordan’s food supply is still to be assessed, especially with respect to the growing seasons of 2021 to 2022. While emergency interventions are already being defined, a full recovery will entail a more in-depth analysis of the issues, opportunities and vulnerabilities of Jordan’s food supply through a dynamic private sector, a supportive public sector, and a social net to ensure that “no one is left behind”. Many efforts internally and with external supporters are being implemented in Jordan to ensure progress on these three fronts.
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    Book (series)
    Fish marketing and credit in Viet Nam. 2004
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    Since the early 1980s, exports of fish in Viet Nam have increased significantly while the improvement of domestic marketing and utilization of fish have not received sufficient attention. Improving supplies of fish for urban and rural populations, better quality and safety of products and ensuring food security, particularly for disadvantaged and vulnerable parts of the population, are important concerns which were addressed by studies, the findings of which are presented in this repor t. These findings suggest that the domestic consumption of fish in Viet Nam is probably higher than previously assumed. Given the projected strong economic growth over the coming years, it must be expected that local consumer demand will continue to expand. At the same time, the exportoriented fish processing industry will result in an increased demand for raw materials. This substantial future demand for safe and high quality fish products can only be met if efficient marketing arra ngements are in place. The findings of the studies identify a number of constraints in the present domestic fish marketing channels, which form the basis of recommendations for the improvement of the present marketing arrangements. These include the establishment of fish wholesale markets in large urban areas, establishment of well-functioning assembly markets at important fish landing sites, improvement of the legal/regulatory framework for the operations of fish wholesalers, establ ishment of fish market price information systems, promotion of contract farming/ trading systems among fish market operators certified by local authorities, improvement of fisheries statistics systems for better fish market planning, the promotion of a domestic fish market strategy complementing the export-oriented development strategy and the development of a coordination mechanism for the public sector for fish marketing and fish market management. As far as the fish marketing chai n is concerned, it is recommended that governmental and semi-governmental institutions should play an active role in the improvement of the vertical fish marketing chain. Their cooperation with the private-sector stakeholders is requested as capabilities of the private sector to establish well-working cooperation arrangements seem limited and have not (yet) brought the expected benefits. Publicprivate partnership appears to be the key to success. Credit is widely used for financing m arine capture fisheries, particularly offshore fishing and export-oriented fish culture, processing and marketing. State-owned financial institutions play a major role in financing capital expenditure while working capital requirements are mainly met by informal sources of credit. Future investment requirements and credit needs are greater than current availability. In particular, the domestic fish marketing sector, i.e. wholesalers and retailers, so far have only a limited access to credit and this is perceived as an obstacle to the growth and improvement of the sector. In the case of offshore fisheries, the findings suggest that there should not be any further expansion of credit, and future credit support should focus on making the fleet more efficient and sustainable.
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    Book (series)
    Realigning policy interventions on agricultural prices
    Monitoring incentives in low- and middle-income countries during the first wave of COVID-19
    2022
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    COVID-19 has resulted in a shock to agrifood systems around the world, with the potential for low- and middle-income countries to be particularly affected. Although policy responses were more muted than during the 2007–2008 world food crisis, efforts to insulate from supply shocks and ensure local availability during COVID-19 have generally included export restrictions and import tariff reductions, among other responses. In an effort to enable rapid market monitoring and realignment, we develop a new indicator defined as a monthly nominal rate of protection “express” which seeks to isolate as much as possible the effect of trade and market policies on domestic prices in real-time in order to understand how they responded. This analysis examines changes to this indicator during the first wave of the pandemic in 27 low- and middle-income countries for the most-consumed staple cereals of the poor and food insecure. We show that agricultural price incentives declined by 12.6 percentage points compared to the same months in previous years, suggesting that retail domestic price spikes may have largely been mitigated or avoided. However, impacts varied across countries and commodities, and this indicator can serve as a tool for examining primary drivers of changes and conducting causal analysis to facilitate adequate agrifood policy responses to support economic recovery in the post-COVID-19 era.

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