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Food Price Monitoring and Analysis (FPMA) Tool

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    Presentation
    GLOBEFISH Price Dashboard - Quick Start Guide 2021
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    The GLOBEFISH Price Dashboard takes the prices GLOBEFISH monitors for fisheries and aquaculture products in Europe and presents this information in a powerful and user-friendly interface. It provides a dynamic tool in facing the challenges of monitoring real-time data and making information accessible to end-users. In the GLOBEFISH Price Dashboard, prices are automatically drawn from various sources along the value chain into a central database and updated once a week. The operational features of the GLOBEFISH Price Dashboards support the dissemination of the most up to date prices available. The interface of the GLOBEFISH Price Dashboard allows users to browse prices and analyze trends, as well as search or filter prices according to species, scientific name, species grouping, product presentation or treatment, among other elements.
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    Journal, magazine, bulletin
    Food Price Monitoring and Analysis (FPMA) Bulletin #4, 11 May 2022
    Monthly Report on Food Price Trends
    2022
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    International prices of coarse grains fell in April as maize harvests in Argentina and Brazil helped ease pressure on maize markets. By contrast, wheat prices edged upwards as global supply tightness persisted amidst the significantly reduced exports from Ukraine due to war-related impacts on export supply chains. For rice, strong Asian demand and weather setbacks in the Americas drove international prices up during April. In West Africa, new record high prices of coarse grains were reported in several countries, driven by a seasonal uptick in demand, lower cross‑border trade flows and higher international commodity prices. Conflicts in the Sahel and weak currencies in coastal countries added upward pressure on domestic prices. In East Africa, prices of coarse grains remained firm or increased further in April and continued to be well above their year-earlier levels across the subregion. Exceptionally high price levels continued to prevail in South Sudan and the Sudan. In Far East Asia, in Sri Lanka, prices of rice and wheat flour increased further in April to new highs mostly due to the sustained effects of precipitous currency depreciation and the below-average 2022 “Maha” crop output. In South America, prices of wheat in April remained significantly higher year on year and at record highs in some countries, owing to strong international demand in exporting countries and elevated international quotations in net-importing countries.
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    Journal, magazine, bulletin
    Food Price Monitoring and Analysis (FPMA) Bulletin #3, 14 April 2023
    Monthly report on food price trends
    2023
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    International prices of all major cereals declined in March. World wheat prices fell significantly, reflecting ample supplies, strong export competition and the extension of the Black Sea Grain Initiative (BSGI). A mix of factors, including ongoing harvests in South America, expected record output in Brazil and currency depreciation in Argentina, led to a decline in maize prices. International rice prices also eased in March, weighed by ongoing or imminent harvests in major Asian exporters. FAO’s analysis of the latest available data shows domestic staple food prices, despite some declines, continue to be very high in many countries in March 2023. Seasonal harvest pressures in parts of East Asia and ample availability of wheat from major exporters in the CIS (Asia and Europe) supported month‑on‑month declines in some staple food prices. Conflict and civil insecurity remained an underlying driver of food price increases in Haiti, and parts of East and West Africa, while weather related shocks were key contributing factors in parts of East and Southern Africa. In many countries, currency weaknesses and high transport costs continue to support elevated prices of both domestically produced and imported food commodities.

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