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Climate change in Africa

The threat to agriculture







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    Booklet
    The Republic of Moldova: Rapid response plan, March–December 2023 2023
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    The compounded impacts of the war in Ukraine and adverse climatic conditions underline the urgency of supporting the livelihoods of the most vulnerable farming households in the Republic of Moldova. In addition to the impacts of the war in Ukraine, the Republic of Moldova has a high level of exposure and vulnerability to hydrometeorological hazards, which became more unpredictable and increased in frequency and severity because of climate change. This document presents a summary of the context, outputs, activities and funding requirements of the Rapid response plan (RRP) of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) in the Republic of Moldova. Through the RRP, FAO is calling on resource partners to contribute to addressing the immediate needs of agriculture-dependent communities and tackling the urgent challenges of the Moldovan agrifood system. The RRP aims to prioritize interventions that can mitigate the short- and medium-term effects of the current crisis.
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    Book (series)
    Africa - Regional Overview of Food Security and Nutrition 2023
    Statistics and trends
    2023
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    Africa is facing a food crisis of unprecedented proportions. Millions are expected to be at risk of worsening hunger in the near future due to the rippling effects of the war in Ukraine, which are compounding the devastating impacts that conflicts, climate variability and extremes, economic slowdowns and downturns, and the aftereffects of the COVID-19 pandemic are having on the most vulnerable. In this context, social and gender inequalities are also on the rise, with women and girls being among the most affected by these shocks.Despite efforts made in several countries, the African continent is not on track to meet the food security and nutrition targets of the Sustainable Development Goal 2 on Zero Hunger for 2030, and certainly the Malabo targets of ending hunger and all forms of malnutrition by 2025. The most recent estimates show that nearly 282 million people in Africa (about 20 percent of the population) were undernourished in 2022, an increase of 57 million people since the COVID-19 pandemic began. About 868 million people were moderately or severely food-insecure and more than one-third of them – 342 million people – were severely food-insecure.The present edition of the report presents the latest analysis of the prevalence and trends in undernourishment, food insecurity, and malnutrition. In addition, it includes, for the first time, estimates of the cost and affordability of a healthy diet, which are useful indicators of people’s economic access to nutritious foods and healthy diets.The deterioration of the food security situation and the lack of progress towards the WHO global nutrition targets make it imperative for countries to step up their efforts ifthey are to achieve a world without hunger and malnutrition by 2030. The call for greater action remains true in view of the projected lower rate of economic growth, high general andfood price inflation, and raising borrowing costs on domestic and international markets since 2022.
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    Project
    Mainstreaming Nutrition in National and Regional Trade Laws and Regulations of Small Island Developing States (SIDS) and Promoting Local Food Value Chains for Intra-Sids Trade - TCP/RAF/3707 2021
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    SIDS suffer from the effects of climate change shocks. Cyclones, hurricanes and more erratic rainfall leading to drought, flooding, rising sea levels and eroding coastlines exacerbate already fragile natural environments, making it more difficult to produce sufficient food to meet their needs. Given their geographic and economic isolation, many SIDS rely heavily on remote markets for their food supplies, leading to undernutrition, micronutrient deficiencies and obesity, the ‘triple burden’ of malnutrition. Diabetes and other non-communicable chronic diseases are at excessive levels in a growing number of SIDS, largely as a result of a diet of processed imported foods that are high in sugar, salt and fats, aggravated by unchecked trade liberalization policies. Although undernutrition has fallen over the past three decades, levels of stunting still exceed 20 percent in children in the poorest SIDS. At the same time, levels of obesity, particularly among women, have increased sharply in many SIDS, including those in Africa. Food imports are an increasingly important source of food availability in most SIDS, despite the poor nutritional quality of many imported foods. Foreign investment in domestic food processing sectors in some SIDS has also contributed to the increased availability, and lower prices, of highly processed foods. The result has been a shift away from traditional, domestic staples, such as fruit and vegetables, towards diets high in processed and animal source foods, sugar, fat and salt. This shift has been identified as a leading driver behind the sharp rise in obesity and micronutrient deficiency in SIDS.

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