Thumbnail Image

Newly proposed harvest method, branch-cut harvest for Aralia elata extends cold storage life and maintains the quality of edible shoots

XV World Forestry Congress, 2-6 May 2022










Also available in:
No results found.

Related items

Showing items related by metadata.

  • Thumbnail Image
    Document
    Effect of serial harvesting of shoots on rooting ability of teak clones
    XV World Forestry Congress, 2-6 May 2022
    2022
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    Rejuvenation of shoots through budding and serial harvesting was carried out to produce shoots for rooted cutting of 106 teak clones. 3-month-old budded seedlings were topped and leaf pruned to stimulate secondary shoots that used for rooted cutting. 1-month old secondary shoots were harvested and rooted cutting in non-mist propagators. Number of shoots per stock and rooting ability of each clone were recorded for 6 consequences shoot harvesting at 2 weeks interval. 1 month after propagating showed that rooting ability were high significantly (Pr(>F) = 0.489) difference among clones. 35 clones had high rooting ability averaged more than 60 percent, 56 clones had 40-60 percent, while 15 clones had less than 40 percent. Number of shoots per stock and rooting ability were high significantly affected by order of consequence shoot harvesting. Average number of shoots per stock were 0.85, 0.87, 0.74, 0.88, 0.70 and 0.60 shoots (not every stock plant produce shoot in every harvesting round) while rooting ability were 54.01, 44.37, 19.68, 63.87, 81.90 and 73.63 percent for 1st to 6th shoot harvesting respectively. Number of shoots per stock increased from 1st until 4th cut and then decreased when 5th and 6th cut. Later harvesting trended to increase rooting ability. Keywords: Teak, serial harvesting of shoots, rooted cutting, Rejuvenation, clone ID: 3486299
  • Thumbnail Image
    Document
    Production and fuel properties of wood chips from logging residues by timber harvesting methods
    XV World Forestry Congress, 2-6 May 2022
    2022
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    This study calculated the productivity and cost of extraction and processing of logging residues by cut-to-length (CTL) and whole-tree (WT) harvesting methods. In addition, the comparative analysis of the characteristics of wood chip fuel to examine whether it was suitable for the fuel conditions of the energy facility. In the harvesting and processing system to produce the wood chips of logging residues the system productivity and cost of the CTL harvesting system were 1.6 Gwt/SMH and 89,865 won/Gwt, respectively. The productivity and cost of the WT harvesting system were 2.9 Gwt/SMH and 72,974 won/Gwt, respectively. The WT harvesting productivity increased 1.3times while harvesting cost decreased by 18.7% compared to the CTL harvesting system. The logging residues of wood chips were not suitable for CTL wood chips based on International Organization for Standardization (ISO 17225-4:2021) and South Korea standard (NIFoS, 2020), but the quality (A2, Second class) was improved through screening operation. The WT-unscreened wood chips conformed to NIFoS standard (second class) and did not conform to ISO but were improved through screening operation (Second class). In addition to the energy facility in plant A, all wood chips except CTL-unscreened wood chips were available through drying processing. The WT-unscreened wood chips were the lowest at 99,408 won/Gwt. Plants B, C, and D had higher moisture content than plant A, so WT-unscreened wood chips without drying processing were the lowest at 57,204 won/Gwt. Therefore, the production of logging residues should improve with operation methods that improve the quality of wood chips required for applying the variable biomass and energy facility. Keywords: Research, Sustainable forest management ID: 3622432
  • Thumbnail Image
    Document
    Evaluation of carbon stocks of domestic wood products to improve carbon sinks in the forest sector
    XV World Forestry Congress, 2-6 May 2022
    2022
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    Harvested Wood Products (HWP) is recognized as a carbon pool in the forest sector, along with biomass, dead wood, litter and soil. There was a debate about which country should include carbon stocks in imported or exported HWP. At the 17th Conference of the Parties in Durban (COP17) in 2011, domestic harvested wood products were accepted as accounted carbon pools and thus have to be reported by all Parties included in Annex I. Although the HWP carbon calculation method related to this has been suggested since the IPCC 2006 guidelines, it could not be calculated due to the lack of HWP statistics data in Korea.
    In this study, to estimate the carbon stock and the annual stock changes for each of the HWP categories. Input data on the production of wood products used in the model to estimate carbon emissions and removals from HWP in Korea were acquired from database of the 'Wood utilization survey report' and 'Statistical yearbook of Forestry' in Korea Forest Service. In particular, statistic data on production of sawnwood, wood-based panels and paper and paperboard were obtained for the period 1989–2019. It used the first order decay function with default half-lives of 35, 25 and two years, respectively. For the conversion of wood volume or weight into carbon the default conversion factors and half-lives provided by IPCC guideline. As a result of the calculation, it was estimated that about 0.7 million tCO2 was stored according to the use of domestic wood products in 2019. It is expected that it will be possible to quantify the carbon storage effect of HWP and to activate the use of wood products. Indeed, it could change if life expectancy of HWPs improves into the future. Furthermore, additional mitigation potential may be achieved when substituting emissions-intensive materials. Keywords: Sustainable forest management, Climate change, Value chain ID: 3619351

Users also downloaded

Showing related downloaded files

No results found.