Thumbnail Image

The Three Lines of Defense Model: A framework for risk management and internal control









Also available in:
No results found.

Related items

Showing items related by metadata.

  • Thumbnail Image
    Document
    Annual update of OIG’s 2016-2017 biennial workplan - April 2017 2017
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    This document provides an update on the biennial plan for 2016-2017 as reviewed by the Audit Committee and concurred by the Director-General in February 2016. This annual update was prepared using a risk management approach (for the first time, the risk module of OIG audit software, TEAMRISK, was used) and taking into account input from senior management, coordination with other oversight bodies and available resources.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Brochure, flyer, fact-sheet
    National stakeholder consultation on strengthening national capacity for risk-based food import control within One Health framework in Sri Lanka
    Meeting summary report
    2018
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    The consultation meeting “Strengthening national capacity for risk-based food import control within a One Health Framework” was held on 30 November 2017 at Galle Face Hotel, Colombo, Sri Lanka. The main objective of the consultation was to validate the information presented in the draft report entitled “National situation of imported food controls in Sri Lanka”, and to identify the priority actions to be considered while developing a roadmap for effective risk-based imported food control in the country. Thirty-two participants attended the consultation, including high-level officials from imported food control-relevant government agencies, stakeholder groups and resource people, provided input during the plenary and group discussions following the presentation of the national situation report. Group discussions were held on four focus areas: Sri Lanka Customs, Plant Quarantine, Animal Quarantine and Sri Lanka Standards Institution. Requirements identified by the Customs Department included improving the Customs database so that information can be shared with all of the relevant stakeholders, and establishing an alert system for high-risk foods. Plant and animal quarantine groups stated the need for upgrading laboratory capacities (both technical and human), strengthening pre-border requirements with required certificates, and providing guidance on the approval of certain commodities. Requirements required by the Sri Lanka Standards Institution included improving existing regulations and standards to address globally emerging food safety issues, conducting risk-based country profiling, setting up a unit for surveillance and import trade analysis, improving communication mechanisms by establishing information sharing systems among stakeholders on the results of the sample analysis and certification systems. In order to strengthen the existing imported food control system, immediate actions based on these requirements are recommended and include: 1) organizing training sessions on risk categorization for food safety competent authorities, quarantine officers and custom officials; and 2) ensuring the use of a risk categorization list, developing standard operating procedures for sampling and inspection at the borders and organizing training sessions on imported food inspection for relevant officials; and 4) developing a single-window, information-sharing system among relevant agencies and importers. A roadmap for effective risk-based imported food control in Sri Lanka has been drafted, and a consultation with relevant high-level stakeholder representatives to validate and agree on the roadmap is suggested as a next step.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Book (stand-alone)
    Practical guidelines on pesticide risk reduction for locust control in Caucasus and Central Asia 2019
    The Guidelines discuss the risks of insecticide handling and use before, during and after locust control campaigns, as well as measures that can be taken to minimize those risks. The Guidelines target three types of staff: 1) Decision makers and campaign organizers – i.e. senior staff in the locust control unit – who require guidance on organizational aspects of risk reduction before, during and after the control campaign; 2) Locust control staff – i.e. control team supervisors, pesticide applicators, drivers, store keepers – who require guidance on best practices and risk reduction measures during the campaign; 3) Monitoring staff – i.e. from specialized human health and environmental monitoring teams – who need guidance and best practices for the monitoring of insecticide application, efficacy, human health and environmental aspects of locust control operations. The Guidelines are structured following the main stages of a locust control campaign. First, the risk reduction measures during the preparation of the campaign are discussed, including insecticide selection, contingency plans, Personal Protective Equipment, human health and the environmental monitoring and training. The second section describes the environmental and health risks during locust control operations. Insecticide transport and storage, use of Personal Protective Equipment, insecticide applications, empty container management, and monitoring of human health and environmental risks are covered. The third section discusses activities after the end of the control campaign, such as management of empty containers, remaining pesticides, or follow-up monitoring. The Selected References at the end of the document provide links to various topics that are discussed in these guidelines.

Users also downloaded

Showing related downloaded files

No results found.