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SDG Localization in Europe and Central Asia

Guidelines to support subnational development planning and budgeting









FAO and UNDP. 2023. SDG localization in Europe and Central Asia – Guidelines to support subnational development planning and budgeting. Budapest. 




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    Guidelines on forest biodiversity monitoring methodologies for Central Asian countries 2023
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    For effective forest biodiversity monitoring in FAO Sub-regional Office for Central Asia (SEC) countries (Azerbaijan, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan and Türkiye), it is important to develop cost-effective and efficient monitoring methods. The main purpose of the guidelines on forest biodiversity monitoring methodologies is to support FAOSEC countries in their efforts to detect changes in forest biodiversity and to ensure that appropriate measures are taken for sustainable forest management. The monitoring process begins with the assessment of monitoring requirements and the establishment of specific goals for the subsequent development of the monitoring approach. Subsequently, essential factors such as indicators, methods and tools for monitoring, team composition, frequency of monitoring, and data management are identified to shape the monitoring initiative, integrating aspects related to the state, impact, and response. The monitoring process is then concluded through the practical implementation of the program via field investigations, analysis and interpretation of the gathered information, and dissemination of resultant reports to pertinent stakeholders. The guidelines for forest biodiversity monitoring methodologies employ this comprehensive five-step monitoring cycle as a foundation for crafting an efficient forest biodiversity monitoring program. The guidelines on forest biodiversity monitoring methodologies are designed to take into account the changes in pressure, state and response indicators especially for biodiversity monitoring with the contributions of subject-matter experts. This study uses the "Pressure-State-Response" framework that has been frequently used in different global, regional, and national monitoring programs. In the guidelines, monitoring targets for species, habitats, ecosystem services, and forestry practices are defined for each monitoring component by using relevant indicators. Using Türkiye’s national biodiversity database (Noah’s Ark Database) and its monitoring tables as samples, the indicators are tabulated with detailed information on the following topics: • Monitoring Level • Monitoring Period and Frequency • Monitoring Area • Monitoring Method • Monitoring Team/Expertise • Target / Success Criteria For effective implementation of the guidelines, a governance mechanism is also proposed for the participation of regional and national stakeholders. The guidelines serve as a comprehensive framework for monitoring forest biodiversity in FAOSEC countries with the aim of providing practical guidance and recommendations for establishing effective forest biodiversity monitoring systems in those countries. The guidelines also emphasize the importance of harmonization and standardization of biodiversity indicators and methods across countries, enhancing comparability and facilitating regional and global reporting.
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    Monitoring, Evaluation and Learning Framework
    A handbook in support of the implementation of the Voluntary Guidelines for Securing Sustainable Small-Scale Fisheries in the Context of Food Security and Poverty Eradication
    2023
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    In 2014, the first internationally negotiated instrument dealing specifically with artisanal and small-scale fisheries known as the Voluntary Guidelines for Securing Sustainable Small-Scale Fisheries in the Context of Food Security and Poverty Eradication (SSF Guidelines) was endorsed. The scope of the SSF Guidelines is to promote globally a human rights-based approach, covering every social and economic aspect of fisheries governance relevant to all activities undertaken by men and women, in marine and inland waters fisheries value chains. To support and promote the implementation of this important instrument, systematic monitoring is needed in accordance with the provisions in paragraph 13.4, calling for “participatory assessment methodologies that allow a better understanding and documentation of the true contribution of small-scale fisheries to sustainable resource management for food security and poverty eradication”. This handbook aims to support such monitoring and contains a Monitoring, Evaluation and Learning Framework for the SSF Guidelines implementation (MEL4SSF). It provides a clear and accessible guide and a step-by-step process, using the theory of change methodology. The aim is to help all those engaged in the monitoring of the SSF Guidelines at the local or national level, including governments and stakeholder organizations, and promote participatory processes in line with paragraph 13.5 of the SSF Guidelines.
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    Environmental management and environmental impact assessment in aquaculture: Training Workshop for aquaculture managers. Entebbe, Uganda
    GCP/RAF/466/EC SmartFish Project
    2013
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    The overall objective of the SmartFish programme is to contribute to an increased level of social, economic and environmental development and deeper regional integration in the Eastern-Southern Africa and Indian Ocean Region (ESA-IO), through the sustainable exploitation of fisheries resources. The programme is funded by the European Union under the 10th European Development Fund and is implemented under the overall responsibility of the Indian Ocean Commission. Within the framework of SmartFish Result 5, Output 5M3.1, improved Environmental Management and Environmental Impact Assessment in Aquaculture (EIAA) was identified as a means by which sustainable benefits from aquaculture can be ensured. The regional training workshop was organized for SmartFish beneficiary countries with the objective of enabling them to improve country application and compliance of environmental impact assessment and environmental management of aquaculture, which would in turn help them foster sustainable de velopment. All SmartFish member countries participated in the organization of the workshop, from the assessment of training needs, to the design of the training programme, through to the training itself. Based on the findings from the initial needs assessment exercise, the workshop targeted national aquaculture managers. Findings from the needs assessment suggested focusing on improving practical knowledge and skills to address the following topics:  Aquaculture inputs and resources;  Aquacult ure outputs and impacts;  Why undertake environmental management;  Site selection and estimating capacity;  Modeling aquaculture impact;  Environmental regulations and their application;  EIAA components and process;  Environmental Management planning;  Environmental monitoring;  Strategic Environmental Assessment. The training sessions involved active discussions and practical exercises, which included field tours and case studies. In the case studies, participants evaluated pond and ca ge based aquaculture investments within the context of EIAA. They took into account the technical aspects, as well as the socio-economic and ecosystem requirements and impacts likely to arise from aquaculture. The evaluation of case studies followed steps based on recommended best practices from EIAA and Environmental Management Procedures (EMP). 5 The steps below show how participants undertook the review of their case studies:  Evaluation of the business plan;  EIAA screening process;  Ide ntification of main issues likely to arise, including identification of key stakeholders, stakeholder consultation exercises (done during field visit) and risk analysis of the main issues;  Identification of data requirements for analysis, evaluation and monitoring;  Identification of mitigation measures;  Presentation of findings that were outlined as EIAA and EMP to the departments of Environment and Aquaculture1 for final evaluation, approval and licensing. At the end of the workshop, part icipants expressed the value of working together with all relevant stakeholders. Aquaculture as an enterprise is cross-cutting and EIAA and EMPs cannot be implemented effectively by primary departments alone. Moreover, participants were able to identify the key issues in their respective countries, and the appropriate practical steps needed to be put in place, which would enable them to become more effective in EIAA considering both their national and local conditions. The following were identif ied by participants as being the gaps for which additional support would be required in order to improve levels of effective implementation of EIAA in the region:  Specialized training that targets managers (both in aquaculture and environmental institutions), practitioners and the general public, focusing on building skills and improving levels of public awareness.  Building the capacity of the various public institutions and the private sector, through building Public-Private-Partnerships, i n order to implement EIAA and better manage the general environmental issues of aquaculture. The following proposals were put forward: the development and production of user manuals for the different audiences; the provision of field and laboratory equipment; undertaking Strategic Environmental Assessments; setting up specialized EIAA units within departments; and, establishing effective functional linkages between key departments, notably the National Environmental Management Agencies and Fishe ries aquaculture institutions. Information management systems should also be looked at.  Development and/or improvement of general and specific national policies, regulations, strategies and guidelines, including their implementation.  Adoption of environmentally friendly systems and practices at all times.

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