Thumbnail Image

Action, function, & structure: Interpreting network effects on behavior in rural Malawi

ESA Working Paper No. 07-12








Also available in:
No results found.

Related items

Showing items related by metadata.

  • Thumbnail Image
    Book (stand-alone)
    Assessing the digital readiness and communication ecosystem of rural youth
    Methodological guidelines
    2024
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    Digitalization is a potential game-changer to boost youth engagement and leadership in agrifood systems. Digital engagement can increase youth access to timely information, training, or marketing opportunities while providing more venues for peer learning, networking, and participation in policy dialogues. Yet, the transformative power of digital technologies also entails the risk of widening existing divides. As we seek to engage youth in the digital space, we must consider a series of interrelated factors that influence their online experiences ranging from digital access, use, and literacy, to overall information flows, offline communication resources, social interactions, and the norms shaping them. These methodological guidelines will be a useful resource for development professionals who wish to leverage communication and digital technologies in their work with and for youth. The document provides an analytical framework and practical orientation to conduct age-specific and gender-responsive research on digital readiness and the overall communication ecosystem of young people in order to inform inclusive engagement strategies and youth-centred digital services. Section 1 explains the rationale behind investing time and resources in appraising the existing communication ecosystem before designing any initiative aimed at engaging youth in agrifood systems and in rural areas. Section 2 outlines an analytical framework to unpack the digital readiness and the communication ecosystem of young rural women and men along major investigation areas: digital access, use and skills; information flows; offline communication resources; and social capital and social norms. Section 3 describes how to conduct hands-on research combining the use of both qualitative and quantitative methods. Section 4 summarizes final considerations and take-home messages. The Annexes provide two examples of data collection tools, namely a mobile survey questionnaire and a focus group discussion guide, while the Field Stories present real-life examples testifying to the multiple and varied applications of the methodology within the scope of FAO’s Integrated Country Approach (ICA) for Boosting Decent Jobs for Youth in the Agrifood System project.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Book (stand-alone)
    Characteristics, patterns and drivers of rural migration in Senegal 2020
    Also available in:

    Although migratory flows from rural areas are a common phenomenon in most developing countries, we possess little information on their dynamics and determinants. In this context, in September 2017, in the framework of the project “Fostering productive investments to create decent farm and non-farm jobs for rural youth in migration-prone areas in Senegal”, FAO and the Senegalese National Agency of Statistics and Demography (ANSD) conducted a household survey with the aim of generating information on migration phenomena in rural areas. The survey results described in this study contribute to broadening the available knowledge base on the causes and dynamics of rural migration and aim to inform sectoral economic policies, youth employment and rural development policies.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Book (stand-alone)
    Domestic and international migration from rural Mexico: Disaggregating the effects of network structure and composition 2002
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    This paper explores how the composition of migrant networks affects the national and international migration decisions in Mexico, focusing on the distinct influence of networks on rural-to-rural, rural-to-urban, and rural-to-international migration. The emphasis on rural out-migration is partly a reflection of data availability but is also because networks are likely to be more important in rural areas where information is less readily available. Furthermore, in rural out-migration the alternati ve destinations are easily identified and distinct, allowing for the role of networks to be clearly established.

Users also downloaded

Showing related downloaded files

No results found.