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Creating Employment in Agriculture Sector in Mongolia - GCP/MON/014/EC








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    Project
    Mongolia Animal Health and Veterinary Services Support - TCP/MON/3607 2020
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    A key objective of the Government of Mongolia is toincrease economic growth from livestock resources andfrom meat exports, including heat-processed products.Animals, both domestic and wild, play an important role ingenerating sustainable income. Meat, dairy, wool,cashmere and leather raw materials are produced fromgoats, sheep, yak, cattle, camels and horses for furtherprocessing, while wild animals are important both fortourism and in terms of national heritage. In addition,meat exports are critical to managing pressure on pasturelands due to overpopulation/overgrazing of livestock.Animal diseases, as well as the challenges surroundingtheir prevention and control, are well established asthe main impediment to the sustainable development ofthe livestock sector. This is directly associated with thecapacity of the national veterinary services to minimizethe animal disease burden and promote animal health.Nevertheless, Mongolia’s services are currently underextreme pressure, facing animal diseases that are liableto limit trade. The large number of livestock creates high demand forveterinary services. With increasing exports, the highdemand for veterinary services may need to grow furtherto allow compliance with certification inspection,international health standards, quarantines, etc.A number of initiatives have been undertaken in Mongoliaby the Government and its development partners. Forinstance, there are areas of the country free fromFoot-and-mouth disease (FMD) that comply with thestandards of the World Organisation for Animal Health(OIE), an animal identification database is in place, witha number of companies selling ear tags and electronicmonitoring chips, while there is also a draft veterinarydrug residue detection plan.
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    Mongolia and FAO: Achievements and Success Stories 2011
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    Mongolia became a member of FAO in 1974, and was accredited through the FAOR office in China. However, since 2000, a full FAO Liaison has been established in Ulaanbaatar, also accredited to the FAO Representative in China. The FAO Liaison Office in Mongolia was opened on 1 July 2009. The Liaison Office facilitates projects implementation according to FAO rules and regulations. Prior to the opening of the office, distance, communication and language obstacles often hindered timely delivery of pro ject inputs and results. Agriculture plays an important role in Mongolia’s economy, contributing 21.7 percent to GDP, accounting for 14 percent of export earnings and employing 40 percent of the labour force. FAO has been playing an important role in introducing technical know how and assisting the government in rebuilding sectors such as livestock breeding, dairy and forestry that collapsed during the jarring transformation from a centrally planned, socialist economy to a market-oriented and de mocratic system. FAO has been providing technical support and implementing projects in areas such as food security and safety, agricultural statistics, water management and irrigation, actions against soaring food prices, regional control of transboundary animal diseases, livestock products processing, and forestry. Since Mongolia joined FAO in 1974, it has received assistance to the tune of $3.7 million under the Technical Cooperation Programme (TCP), and roughly $3.4 million under four Trust F und projects for a total of US$7.167 million. During the last five years, FAO programmes and projects have been dramatically increased, mainly focusing on the livestock sector with active the collaboration of government counterpart
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    Project
    Strengthening the Legal Framework for Inclusive and Sustainable Growth of Mongolia’s Vegetable Sector - GCP/MON/015/SWI 2020
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    Under the project, the existing legal policy concerning vegetable value chains in Mongolia was reviewed and draft policies were formulated based on the advice of legal and agricultural experts. Workshops on international best practices were delivered to Government personnel, researchers, seed breeders and farmers in order to develop a stronger understanding of legal policy and regulations on a national scale. As civil servants are the primary Government personnel who deal with policy at the field level, training was also delivered to enhance their capacity in the management and implementation of integrated pest management (IPM), good agricultural practices (GAP) and organic agriculture. Training facilitators, legal experts and representatives from relevant Government departments and national inspection agencies were all involved in this process. Subsequently, the implementation of regulations for IPM, GAP, pesticide management and organic agriculture were piloted in target areas. Civil servants worked directly with participating farmers by explaining national policy and regulations, the necessary actions for compliance with Mongolia’s food safety laws and their essential roles in the advancement of the country. Published technical guidelines and resources on these laws and regulations were also provided.

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