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Sustainable wood for people and the planet

21 March 2022 ǀ 12.00-13.00 (GMT+7)










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    Article
    A transition framework for integration of non-wood forest products into the bioeconomy
    XV World Forestry Congress, 2-6 May 2022
    2022
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    Non-wood forest products (NWFP) are essential to the health and livelihoods of billions of people and are increasingly preferred by consumers worldwide. The plants, fungi, lichens, and animals that provide these products are essential for global biological diversity and are the raw materials for multi-billion-dollar global industries. While overexploitation of these resources often was linked to poverty and food scarcity in lower- income countries, today, unsustainable resource use is also linked to global market demand and even pressure from recreational harvesting in high-income countries. To ensure present and future production, without compromising forest health and resiliency or the people who rely on and benefit from NWFP, these resources should be included at all levels of forest management. The concept of a bioeconomy, which involves using science-based knowledge for sustainable production of food, energy, and other renewable bio-products, provides a framework for ‘green’ growth. NWFP are produced in myriad of systems and realigning these to a bioeconomy framework offers opportunities to refocus and strengthen efforts to achieve a sustainable future with forests that work locally and can be scaled up to achieve global Sustainable Development Goals. We provide contemporary examples of NWFP and the conditions that support their integration into the bioeconomy. From these cases, we identify factors that may stimulate the transition to a bioeconomy with NWFP. Keywords: Forest development, sustainable transformation, economic transitions, nontimber forest products ID: 3480571
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    Document
    Potentials of non-Wood Forest Products for Value Chain Development, Value Addition and Development of NWFP-Based Rural Microenterprises in Sudan
    Consultancy report
    2017
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    There is global recognition that forests are not only about trees but also about the people who live in and around them. Empirical evidence on the role of forests in food security, poverty reduction through income and employment generation, and addressing the challenges of climate change is increasingly being generated and documented. Over 1.6 billion people worldwide depend heavily on forest resources for their livelihoods, of which 1.2 billion people in developing countries use trees on farms to generate food and income. For the Near East and North Africa (NENA) region where forest resources are scarce and the potentials for timber production are limited, non-wood forest products (NWFPs) such as fruit, bark, roots, tubers, corms, leaves, flowers, nuts, gums, sap, resins, dyes, honey, mushrooms, medicinal and aromatic plants, and wildlife animal products are becoming ever more important. Local people use these products to meet their daily needs; as a source of food, fodder and medicin e, and to generate income. However, current production of NWFPs represents a small fraction of what it could actually be in most countries in the region, and its full potential for poverty reduction, livelihood improvement and environmental sustainability has yet to be harnessed to help local people in the region out of poverty and food insecurity. Although the commercialization of NWFPs in the NENA region runs deep in the region’s history and has done for thousands of years, local producers sti ll remain on the side-lines and receive a much smaller commercial margin compared to what other actors receive. In this context the FAO, through its Regional Initiative for Small-Scale Family Farming (SSFF), supported country studies in selected NENA countries on the potential of NWFPs for value chain development and value addition to generate evidence-based data on the valorization of NWFPs in the NENA region. The aim is to support policy recommendations, strategies and actions that can increas e benefit retention and poverty reduction by commercializing NWFPs at the local level and boost their contribution to the well-being of rural communities, national economies and to the sustainable development of the NENA countries overall.
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    Book (stand-alone)
    The role of wood residues in the transition to sustainable bioenergy
    Analysis of good practices and recommendations for the deployment of wood residues for energy
    2023
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    This report provides an overview of the potential use of wood residues as feedstock for bioenergy production as part of the transition towards a sustainable and circular forest bioeconomy. While data and examples are abundant from developed countries, a specific focus will be put on the role and potential of wood residue-based energy in developing countries. The study is structured around the following four main objectives, each corresponding to a chapter: - define key terms and concepts related to wood residues and bioenergy value chains (Chapter 2); - characterize the status and trends in renewable energy, modern bioenergy and the forest-based bioeconomy and evaluate the theoretical potential of wood residues for energy (Chapter 3); - determine general success factors, common lessons learned and constraints on the utilization of wood residues for energy (Chapter 4); and - formulate recommendations (Chapter 5). The overall aim is to inform new policies and programmes through the identification of optimal conditions whereby the use of wood residues for energy can offer a competitive alternative to other fuels in developing countries and contribute towards reaching the UN SDGs.

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