Thumbnail Image

Ten years of the Ethiopian Agricultural Transformation Agency – An FAO evaluation of the Agency’s impact on agricultural growth and poverty reduction

Brief











Also available in:
No results found.

Related items

Showing items related by metadata.

  • Thumbnail Image
    Book (stand-alone)
    Ten years of the Ethiopian Agricultural Transformation Agency
    An FAO evaluation of the Agency’s impact on agricultural growth and poverty reduction
    2020
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    Through a rigorous, multi-stage analysis, the evidence generated by this corporate evaluation demonstrates the effectiveness of Ethiopian Agricultural Transformation Agency (ATA)’s business plan for achieving measurable changes in Ethiopia’s agricultural sector, both at micro and macro levels. The assessment also identifies areas for renewed and refined emphasis, as well as strategic planning for the future planning and monitoring of ATA’s work. This evaluation finds that ATA has achieved many of the outcomes it is being measured against, in terms of input use, extension services, and agricultural technology. The outcomes observed point to the effective removal of bottlenecks in the rural agricultural economy that have improved the linkages between producers, input markets and agricultural services. The improvements in those priority areas are reflected in productivity gains for certain priority crops and in market orientation positions that confirm ATA’s effectiveness in connecting producers to markets. FAO’s evaluation finds positive macroeconomic effects from ATA interventions, helping to ameliorate the reduction in gross domestic product growth, and also supporting the development of agroindustry and transportation services.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Book (stand-alone)
    Importance of sorghum in the Mali economy: the role of prices in economic growth, agricultural productivity and food security 2018
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    Mali has generated relatively high levels of agricultural growth over the past few decades. While most attention has focused success in cotton, since the early 1990s, staple food production has increased by an annual rate of 2.4 percent, roughly keeping pace with population growth. Most of the production, however, has been through area expansion, which increased at a faster annual pace, 2.0 percent, than the 0.5 percent increase in yields. Studies have found agricultural growth more effective in generating economic growth and reducing poverty than investments elsewhere, including the industrial sector. Mali shares many of the conditions favorable to successful agriculture led growth, including agriculture’s substantial contribution to GDP, a large smallholder population, and poverty concentrated in rural areas. This report investigated the role that sorghum production has played in economic development and poverty reduction in Mali, with a principal focus on how sorghum and similar commodity prices, as proxies to agricultural income, affect economic growth. Findings suggest that while sorghum and other staple food crops contribute to modest rates of economic growth, the lack of commercial marketing opportunities and “cheap food” pricing policy limit agriculture’s growth potential. The artificially low prices paid to Mali’s sorghum producers suppress farm income and constrain the long–term buildup of investment capital needed to adopt more modern and productive technology and management practices. Moreover, the low pricing has aggravated household’s ability to make any meaningful movement out of poverty. Policy needs to move away from pricing mechanisms that artificially maintain low food prices and increase crop research investments in staple food crops so that the large population of rural Malian household engaged in their production become engines of economic growth and bootstrap themselves from poverty.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Book (series)
    Creating employment potential in small-ruminant value chains in the Ethiopian Highlands 2017
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    In December 2014 the Ministry for Livestock Resources Development of Ethiopia presented its Livestock Master Plan (LMP) with the most important targets and priorities to achieve further development of the livestock sector. The LMP contemplates roughly to increase by half the total number of sheep and by a third the total number of goats by the end of 2020. This creates tremendous opportunity for employment creation and income expansion for poor households, and thus a great channel for poverty re duction. An innovative methodology was designed and implemented by FAO to quantify the impact of large scale investments in small ruminant value chains on employment creation. An elaborate quantitative value chain survey, together with several qualitative assessments have been undertaken over a period of 5 months from May to September 2014. This working paper presents the main results of this analytical process. After a short review and summary of the existing knowledge on employment in SRVCs in the Ethiopian highlands (section 3), the wider context, project areas, and analytical methodology are presented (section 4). Section 5 begins with the presentation of the empirical results, by focussing on the technical aspects of production and marketing in the value chain, with particular attention to the practice of small ruminant fattening and achievable profit margins by various actors. Section 6 looks in more detail at relevant employment dimensions along the value chain, focussing on the work particularly of youth and women. Section 7 presents the wider institutional setting and policy environment, in order to set the ground for the concluding chapter which provides the range of opportunities and bottlenecks towards decent employment promotion in the sub-sector, and to develop wider policy and program recommendations at large.

Users also downloaded

Showing related downloaded files

No results found.