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Capacity Development for Farm Management Strategies to Improve Crop-Water Productivity using Aquacrop. Regional Workshop, 17-22 May 2015 - Cordoba, Spain.

Strengthening Agricultural Water Efficiency and Productivity on the African and Global level. GCP/INT/231/SWI Output 1








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    Book (stand-alone)
    Field guide to improve crop water productivity in small-scale agriculture
    The case of Burkina Faso, Morocco and Uganda
    2020
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    By 2050, the world’s population will reach 9.1 billion, which requires an increase of food production by 70 percent compared to 2005 (FAO,2018). Nearly all the increase will occur in developing countries, where agriculture plays a major role to provide employment, income and to improve food security. One of the major challenges of increasing food supply is the limited water resources. Agriculture, as the driver of freshwater exploitation has, therefore, to be transformed into more resource efficient production (FAO, 2003). The world’s limited freshwater resources are potentially threatened by the expansion of agriculture. Increasing the potential output per amount of water used is an appropriate practice to improve production efficiency while protecting water resources. Therefore, increasing the productivity of agricultural water use in a sustainable manner is essential to ultimately sustain the social and economic conditions of livelihoods. Crop water productivity has grown into one of the major approaches to cope with water scarcity and advance crop-water relation. The number of conceptual frameworks and implications is ample, but there is always a growing need to review the step-by-step approach beyond. In this Field guide, practical pathways are presented to provide a comprehensive approach for assessing and improving crop water productivity in small-scale agriculture. The Field guide draws lessons learned in three countries (Burkina Faso, Morocco and Uganda) within the framework of FAO project “Strengthening Agricultural Water Efficiency and Productivity at the African and Global Level” funded by Swiss Agency for Development and Cooperation (SDC).
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    Project
    Regional Training Workshop on Enhancing Water Use Efficiency in Small Scale Irrigation: the Application of FAO’s MASSCOTE Approach. GAP Workshop Report
    8-15 June 2015 - Sanliurfa, Turkey
    2015
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    The project “CP/INT/231/SWI: Strengthening Agricultural Water Efficiency and Productivity on the African and Global Level” aims at reducing hunger and poverty in three African countries (Burkina Faso, Morocco and Uganda) by focusing on the improvement of Agriculture Water Management (AWM) and mainstreaming AWM in national frameworks and processes. The objectives of this project are in line with the Comprehensive Africa Agriculture Development Programme (CAADP), which provides a common framework for stimulating and guiding national, regional and continental initiatives for enhanced agriculture productivity in Africa. The ultimate beneficiaries of the project are the small-scale and family farmers, but the overall approach of the project is a combination of bottom up and top down activities and different levels (micro, meso and macro levels). For this reason, the project will be working with extension agents and farmers’ representatives (micro level), research institutes and regional gov ernance structures (meso level), and national governments (macro level). One of the main outputs of the project is to enhance capacity for increased water use efficiency in small-scale irrigation in Burkina Faso, Morocco and Uganda (Output 2). The workshop “Enhancing Water Use Efficiency in Small Scale Irrigation: The Application of FAO’s MASSCOTE Approach” was one of the activities of this output. The main objective of the workshop was to build capacities of water professionals from Burkina Fas o, Morocco and Uganda (as well as the host country as a step towards south- south cooperation) on increasing water use efficiency of irrigation systems by stimulating critical senses of agricultural water management in diagnosing and evaluating obstacles, constraints and opportunities, and in developing consistent modernization plans/ strategies.
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    Book (series)
    The AquaCrop model – Enhancing crop water productivity
    Ten years of development, dissemination and implementation 2009–2019
    2021
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    Water resources are linked to the global challenges of food insecurity and poverty, as well as to climate change adaptation and mitigation. In line with the Sustainable Development Goals (SGD), FAO works towards several dimensions of sustainable development, including the promotion of coherent approaches to efficient, productive and sustainable water management, from farm to river basin scales. Accordingly, FAO is enhancing well-informed on-the-ground decision-making processes on water management through projects, knowledge advancement, information-sharing and tools development, such as AquaCrop, the FAO crop-water productivity model. This model assists in assessing the effects of environment (including atmospheric CO2 concentration) and management on crop production through the simulation of yield response to water of herbaceous crops. It is particularly suited to address conditions where water is a key limiting factor in crop production. In 2009, FAO officially launched AquaCrop, being the result of several years of collaborative work among scientists, water and crop specialists and practitioners worldwide, bringing together previously fragmented information on crop yields in response to water use and water deficit. AquaCrop has evolved over the different versions released since its first launch, but it always balances accuracy, simplicity and robustness. This has enabled it to remain faithful to its goal, i.e., to be a dynamic tool accessible to several types of users, mainly practitioner-type end users, in different disciplines and for a wide range of applications. In addition, AquaCrop may be considered a valuable tool by research scientists for analysis and conceptualization.

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