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First meeting (virtual) of the steering committee for the global action for Fall Armyworm steering committee. Report

27/feb/20










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    Project
    Support to Enhance Preparedness for Fall Armyworm Invasion among Countries - TCP/INT/3705 2023
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    Fall armyworm ( is a noctuid moth native to the Americas, which is considered a pest due to the substantial agricultural damage it can cause Its larvae feed on over 80 crop species, including maize, rice, sorghum, millet, sugarcane, cotton, and various vegetable species, thus posing a threat to vital rural economies The FAW was reported in Africa for the first time in early 2016 in West and Central African countries and rapidly spread throughout sub Saharan Africa, causing significant agricultural and economic losses The emergence of the FAW was confirmed in India and Yemen in July 2018 and was later reported in Bangladesh Sri Lanka, and Thailand by 2019 A decline in agricultural productivity jeopardizes not only food security but also the livelihoods of farmers Because of crop trade and the moth's remarkable flying capacity, the FAW has the potential to spread to further countries, posing a major risk to crop production, particularly cereals In light of this, many countries have requested assistance to fight against the spread of the FAW and acquire management techniques, as well as monitoring and surveillance for early detection FAO initiated the Global Action for Fall Armyworm Control 2019 2022 as an urgent response to the rapid spread of the FAW This initiative assists smallholder farmers, their associations, public institutions, national governments, and development partners in responding rapidly to FAW infestation In this regard, FAO created a free mobile application for real time FAW monitoring, the fall armyworm monitoring and early warning system ( The Global Action for Fall Armyworm Control has established a global coordination structure to foster an open and collaborative dialogue towards achieving science based solutions This coordination structure is composed of a steering committee ( a working group on resource mobilization ( a technical committee ( and seven technical working groups ( In addition, national task forces ( were created at country levels FAO's Plant Production and Protection Division ( provides technical leadership through the FAW Secretariat, in collaboration with the International Plant Protection Convention ( Secretariat This approach allows all stakeholders, scientists, and governments to interactively discuss challenges and propose solutions that are tailored to each country The project took part in these coordination efforts and sought to assist newly infested countries in taking immediate action in response to the emergence of the FAWFall armyworm ( is a noctuid moth native to the Americas, which is considered a pest.
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    Brochure, flyer, fact-sheet
    Implementation plan for the Global Action for Fall Armyworm Control 2020
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    This document outlines the plan for implementing the three-year Global Action for Fall Armyworm Control. The Global Action activities are based on the following five implementation principles: 1. Awareness-raising Awareness will be increased among all partners and stakeholders at global, regional and national levels to inspire their active engagement in the Global Action. 2. Coordination The activities of the Global Action will be coordinated at the global level through steering and technical committees, and at the national level based on the establishment of FAW national task forces. The global partnership on FAW sustainable management will be strengthened to bring together all partners into a coordinated and coherent structure, in which they can use their comparative advantages in complementary and synergistic ways, to maximize efficiency and effectiveness of the FAW response. 3. Technical support Innovative approaches and technologies, including new digital tools, have been developed and are available for area-specific strategies. These can also be applied for monitoring and early warning; prevention and control; plus surveillance and diagnoses. Technical support will be guided by a Technical Steering Committee and assisted by six Technical Working Groups (TWGs). 4. Resource mobilization Funds will be mobilized from all relevant sources, national budgets, private sector, development partners, development banks and FAO contributions. 5. Communication Outreach strategies at all levels and dissemination of knowledge materials to increase visibility and impact will complement the Global Action. Technical information will be transferred to smallholder farmers.
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    Project
    Support to the Government of Rwanda in Sustainable Control and Management of Fall Armyworm - TCP/RWA/3608 2020
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    With the Fall Armyworm (FAW) pest affecting over 80 crop species in Rwanda in 2017 alone, many farmers saw their yields decrease and incomes depleted. Despite pest management and containment efforts, FAW in Rwanda has remained active since then, given its resistance and adaptability to the country’s climate and ecology. FAW was reported in all of Rwanda’s 30 districts by April 2017, affecting an estimated 38 percent of all maize crops (equal to 17 521 hectares), an essential cash and food crop among the national population at large. This was mainly due to limited capacities of the national research and extension service systems in ensuring early detection and timely response. As a transboundary insect with rapid spreading potential due its natural biological nature – and easily transmitted through trade and commerce – the FAW was found to pose a threat to livestock as well due to FAW-infested feed. In response to the need for integrated pest management (IPM) and early warning systems, the Rwanda Agriculture Board (RAB) requested FAO’s technical support to mitigate FAW-related damage to crops and mitigate their impact on food security. Thus, in strengthening the capacities of the RAB, MINAGRI and District Directorates of Agriculture and Natural Resources, the project ensured a holistic approach to combatting the FAW by leading inter-institutional coordination consultations, capacity assessments, information management initiatives and community-based trainings for community farmers, district and sector agronomists, extension agents, Farmer Field School (FFS) Facilitators and RAB researchers. In addition, FAO’s Fall Armyworm Early Warning System (FAMEWS) mobile application and IPM guidance principles helped drive the training-of-trainers activities. As such, the project’s combination of programmatic coordination, technical assistance and equipment delivery made for a timely response ahead of the September - December 2017 agriculturalseason.

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