Thumbnail Image

Improving planning and policy development in aquaculture: opportunities and challenges

Meeting document COFI:AQ/III/2006/6










Also available in:

Related items

Showing items related by metadata.

  • Thumbnail Image
    Document
    International conference on small and medium forest enterprise development for poverty reduction: Opportunities and challenges in globalizing markets - Report
    Turrialba, Costa Rica, May 23-25, 2006
    2006
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    Organized by the FAO, CATIE and others, this conference’s objectives include: developing a common understanding of the actual and potential role of small and medium forest enterprises in poverty reduction strategies and sustainable forest management; sharing lessons learned in development of forest enterprises, focusing on critical factors such as value chains; and identifying opportunities to strengthen the political legal and institutional frameworks to enable environments for successful small and medium forest enterprise development.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Book (series)
    Report of the Expert Consultation on Improving Planning and Policy Development in Aquaculture. Rome, 26-29 February 2008 2008
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    The Expert Consultation was convened by FAO upon recommendation of the twenty-seventh session of the FAO Committee on Fisheries (COFI), in 2007, and the third session of the FAO COFI Sub-Committee on Aquaculture, in 2006, in order to elaborate guidelines on how to improve the process of aquaculture policy formulation and policy implementation. The Expert Consultation recommended that two outputs be produced by FAO: (i) an FAO Fisheries Technical Paper on planning and policy formulation in aqu aculture development; and (ii) an FAO Technical Guidelines for Responsible Fisheries booklet on planning and policy development in aquaculture. The Consultation produced a detailed outline of the technical guidelines. It agreed on the definitions of policy, strategy and action plan and on the main phases of policy development processes. It highlighted the importance of considerations such as legitimacy, participation in such processes, but in specific circumstances, the inevitability of hard choices. The Consultation emphasized that coordination was one of the most important component of the policy implementation discourse. The Consultation also made recommendations regarding future FAO work in supporting aquaculture policy development worldwide.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Book (series)
    Use of fishery resources as feed inputs for aquaculture development: trends and policy implications. 2006
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    Although aquaculture’s contribution to total world fisheries landings has increased ten-fold from 0.64 million tonnes in 1950 to 54.78 million tonnes in 2003, the finfish and crustacean aquaculture sectors are still highly dependent upon marine capture fisheries for sourcing key dietary nutrient inputs, including fishmeal, fish oil and low value trash fish. This dependency is particularly strong within aquafeeds for farmed carnivorous finfish species and marine shrimp. On the basis of the information presented within this fisheries circular, it is estimated that in 2003 the aquaculture sector consumed 2.94 million tonnes of fishmeal and 0.80 million tonnes of fish oil, or the equivalent of 14.95 to 18.69 million tonnes of pelagics (using a dry meal plus oil to wet fish weight equivalents conversion factor of 4 to 5). Moreover, coupled with the current estimated use of 5 to 6 million tonnes of trash fish as a direct food source for farmed fish, it is estimated that the aquaculture sector consumed the equivalent of 20–25 million tonnes of fish as feed in 2003 for the total production of about 30 million tonnes of farmed finfish and crustaceans (fed finfish and crustaceans 22.79 million tonnes and filter feeding finfish 7.04 million tonnes). At a species-group level, net fish-consuming species in 2003 (calculated on current pelagic input per unit of output using a 4–5 pelagic:meal conversion factor) included river eels, 3.14–3.93; salmon, 3.12–3.90; marine fish, 2.54–3.18; trout, 2.47–3.09 and marine shrimp, 1.61–2.02; whereas net fish producers included freshwater crustaceans, 0.89–1.11; milkfish, 0.30–0.37; tilapia, 0.23–0.28; catfish, 0.22–0.28; and feeding carp, 0.19–0.24. Particular emphasis within the report is placed on the need for the aquaculture sector to reduce its current dependence upon potentially food-grade marine capture-fishery resources for sourcing its major dietary protein and lipid nutrient inputs. Results are presented on the efforts to date concerning the search for cost-effective dietary fishmeal and fish oil replacers, and policy guidelines are given for the use of fishery resources as feed inputs by the emerging aquaculture sector.

Users also downloaded

Showing related downloaded files

No results found.