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Corrective actions – Step 10, Principle 5











FAO. 2023. Corrective actions – Step 10, Principle 5. FAO Good Hygiene Practices (GHP) and Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point (HACCP) Toolbox for Food Safety. Rome. 



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    Booklet
    Monitoring critical control points – Step 9, Principle 4 2023
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    Hazard analysis and critical control point (HACCP) consists of seven principles and is typically described in 12 successive steps. This guidance document provides information on how to establish a monitoring system for each Critical control point (CCP) (Step 9 / Principle 5) to develop an effective HACCP system in accordance with the Codex Alimentarius General Principles of Food Hygiene (CXC 1-1969). Critical control points are monitored through a scheduled measurement or observation of a CCP relative to its critical limits. The monitoring method and frequency should make it possible to detect any failures before they fall outside the established critical limits, so that affected products can be isolated and evaluated in a timely manner. Where possible, CCPs should be monitored continuously (e.g. temperature recording chart). For observable critical limits (e.g. pump settings) where continuous monitoring is not possible, the frequency of monitoring should be appropriate to the deviation and be sufficient to limit the amount of product affected by a deviation. The personnel monitoring CCPs should be properly trained for the task and be capable of addressing any deviations. The monitoring data and records should be reviewed and evaluated by a designated person with the knowledge and authority to carry out corrective actions when needed. This publication is part of the FAO Good Hygiene Practices (GHP) and Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point (HACCP) Toolbox for Food Safety series. The toolbox is a central repository of practical guidance and resource materials to strengthen food safety capacities, both public and private, in order to develop and implement food safety management programmes in accordance with the Codex standards. Care was taken to consider the challenges faced by small food business operators and primary producers in low- and middle-income countries, and those with an institutional role, such as government officials, academia and capacity building organizations.
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    Booklet
    Validation and verification – Step 11, Principle 6 2023
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    Hazard analysis and critical control point (HACCP) consists of seven principles and is typically described in 12 successive steps. This guidance document provides information on how to validate a HACCP plan and perform verification procedures (Step 11 / Principle 6) to develop an effective HACCP system in accordance with the Codex Alimentarius General Principles of Food Hygiene (CXC 1-1969). Before the HACCP plan can be implemented, it should be validated to confirm that it can ensure consistent control of the significant hazards relevant to the food business under production conditions. Validating the HACCP plan could include a review of the scientific literature, using mathematical models, conducting validation studies, and/or using guidance developed by authoritative sources. After the HACCP system has been implemented, procedures should be established to verify that the HACCP plan is being followed and that it is controlling hazards on an ongoing basis. There should also be procedures to show that the control measures are effectively controlling the hazards as intended. Verification also includes reviewing the adequacy of the HACCP system periodically and when changes occur, as appropriate. This publication is part of the FAO Good Hygiene Practices (GHP) and Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point (HACCP) Toolbox for Food Safety series. The toolbox is a central repository of practical guidance and resource materials to strengthen food safety capacities, both public and private, in order to develop and implement food safety management programmes in accordance with the Codex standards. Care was taken to consider the challenges faced by small food business operators and primary producers in low- and middle-income countries, and those with an institutional role, such as government officials, academia and capacity building organizations.
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    Booklet
    Determine critical control points – Step 7, Principle 2 2023
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    Hazard analysis and critical control point (HACCP) consists of seven principles and is typically described in 12 successive steps. This guidance document explains Critical control points (Step 7 / Principle 2) and how to identify them to develop an effective HACCP system in accordance with the Codex Alimentarius General Principles of Food Hygiene (CXC 1-1969). A Critical control point (CCP) is a step at which control can be applied. It is essential to preventing or eliminating a food safety hazard or reducing it to an acceptable level. When trying to determine a CCP, it can be useful to use a decision tree. As part of the process of identifying CCPs, all operational process steps should be reviewed since some of them might be fully controlled by applying the prerequisite GHP programmes. Critical control points should be monitored and documented carefully to ensure that hazards can be effectively controlled. This publication is part of the FAO Good Hygiene Practices (GHP) and Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point (HACCP) Toolbox for Food Safety series. The toolbox is a central repository of practical guidance and resource materials to strengthen food safety capacities, both public and private, in order to develop and implement food safety management programmes in accordance with the Codex standards. Care was taken to consider the challenges faced by small food business operators and primary producers in low- and middle-income countries, and those with an institutional role, such as government officials, academia and capacity building organizations.

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