Thumbnail Image

Improved charcoal technologies and briquette production from woody residues in Malawi











Also available in:
No results found.

Related items

Showing items related by metadata.

  • Thumbnail Image
    Booklet
    Off-grid rural electrification options using crop and woody residues in Côte d’Ivoire
    Bioenergy and Food Security (BEFS) case study
    2018
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    Around two-thirds of the population currently have access to some form of electricity in Côte d’Ivoire, but this share reduces to one in three households in rural areas. The Government of the country is interested in understanding which bioenergy supply chains could be viable for the production of electricity from off grid solutions in rural areas. The case study illustrates the steps required to determine if a series of biomass based value chains can be established to produce electricity in rural areas. The biomass chains considered in this case study are those of crop and woody residues for the generation of electricity through combustion and gasification technology. The case study begins with setting out current policies and the country context, and then analyses the availability of biomass. Once the biomass available is estimated, a techno-economic analysis of electricity from gasification and combustions of these residues is carried out. These technologies are compared to the standard off grid option of diesel powered generators.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Book (series)
    Sustainable bioenergy potential from crop, livestock and woody residues in Rwanda: An integrated bioenergy and food security approach 2023
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    Access to sustainable energy is essential for development, poverty reduction and food security. Rwanda, like many other developing countries, is working on identifying sustainable energy solutions to ensure access to energy. Bioenergy is one possible form of renewable energy that countries are looking at to supply part of their energy portfolio. Rwanda currently relies on traditional biomass for energy supply, and shifting away from traditional biomass use would lower its dependency on traditional biomass and improve access to modern sustainable energy forms. Sustainable bioenergy interlinks closely with the agriculture sector, therefore it is necessary to find specific options that minimize negative impacts on the environment and food security. This accomplishes the dual purpose of energy security and food security. This report assesses the use of agriculture residues for the production of bioenergy in Rwanda. The methodology used for the assessment is the Bioenergy and Food Security (BEFS) approach of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO). The report provides a detailed assessment of the potential of crop, livestock and woody biomass availability for the production of off-grid electricity solutions and cooking fuels. Through the assessment, a number of specific bioenergy pathways are identified as suitable for bioenergy production. These options should be carried forward for piloting in the country and ground truthing.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Book (stand-alone)
    Turning rice residues into energy in combined heat and power systems in Turkey
    BEFS case study
    2018
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    Turkey has a large agriculture sector and relies heavily on imported fossil fuels for most of its domestic energy consumption. As a result, the country has been trying to diversify domestic energy supply and has established several renewable energy targets by renewable energy type, e.g. biomass, solar, hydro. One of these targets is for biomass based electricity production to reach 1 000 MW by 2023. In this context, this case study presents and assesses a specific bioenergy supply chain to produce electricity in a combined heat and power system. The chain considered is that of rice residues from the rice value chain in the province of Samsun.

Users also downloaded

Showing related downloaded files

No results found.