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A survey of national emergency preparedness and response (EPR) systems. FAO Project TCP/INT/3501: Strengthening biosecurity governance and capacities for dealing with the serious shrimp infectious myonecrosis virus (IMNV) disease













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    Improving biosecurity through prudent and responsible use of veterinary medicines in aquatic food production 2012
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    The current trend towards increasing intensification and diversification of global aquaculture has lead to its dramatic growth, thus making aquaculture an important food-producing sector that provides an essential source of aquatic protein for a growing human population. For both developed and developing countries, the sector is recognized as creator of jobs and an important source of foreign export earnings. The expansion of commercial aquaculture, as is the case in commercial livestock and pou ltry production, has necessitated the routine use of veterinary medicines to prevent and treat disease outbreaks due to pathogens, assure healthy stocks and maximize production. The expanded and occasionally irresponsible global movements of live aquatic animals have been accompanied by the transboundary spread of a wide variety of pathogens that have sometimes caused serious damage to aquatic food productivity and resulted in serious pathogens becoming endemic in culture systems and the natura l aquatic environment. The use of appropriate antimicrobial treatments is one of the most effective management responses to emergencies associated with infectious disease epizootics. However, their inappropriate use can lead to problems related to increased frequency of bacterial resistance and the potential transfer of resistance genes in bacteria from the aquatic environment to other bacteria. Injudicious use of antimicrobials has also resulted in the occurrence of their residues in aquacultur e products, and as a consequence, bans by importing countries and associated economic impacts, including market loss have occurred. Since disease emergencies can happen even in well-managed aquaculture operations, careful planning on the use antimicrobials is essential in order to maximize their efficacy and minimize the selection pressure for increased frequencies of resistant variants. The prudent and responsible use of veterinary medicines is an essential component of successful commercial aq uaculture production systems. The FAO/AAHRI Expert Workshop on Improving Biosecurity through Prudent and Responsible Use of Veterinary Medicines in Aquatic Food Production was convened in Bangkok, Thailand from 15 to 18 December 2009, in order to understand the current status of the use of antimicrobials in aquaculture and to discuss the concerns and impacts of their irresponsible use on human health, the aquatic environment and trade. Such discussions became the basis for drafting recommenda tions targeted to the state and private sectors and for developing guiding principles on the responsible use of antimicrobials in aquaculture that will be part of the FAO Code of Conduct for Responsible Fisheries Technical Guidelines on Prudent and Responsible Use of Veterinary Medicines in Aquaculture. Since aquaculture is expected to continue to increase its contribution to the world¿s production of aquatic food, offer opportunities to alleviate poverty, increase employment and community de velopment and reduce overexploitation of natural aquatic resources, appropriate guidance to aquaculture stakeholders on the responsible use of veterinary medicines has become essential. Safe and effective veterinary medicines need to be available for efficient aquaculture production, and their use should be in line with established principles on prudent use to safeguard public and animal health. The use of such medicines should be part of national and on-farm biosecurity plans and in accordance with an overall national policy for sustainable aquaculture. This publication is presented in two parts: Part 1 contains 15 technical background papers presented during the expert workshop, contributed by 28 specialists and which served as a basis for the expert workshop deliberations; Part 2 contains the highlights of the expert workshop.
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    Strengthening Biosecurity Preparedness through Enhanced Rapid Detection of African Swine Fever in Papua New Guinea - TCP/PNG/3706 2021
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    African Swine Fever ( is a highly contagious and fatal hemorrhagic viral disease that affects susceptible Suidae family, including pigs and wild boars In 2019 an expert team from the Emergency Management Centre for Animal Health (EMC AH) FAO conducted a Rapid Preparedness Assessment for ASF in Papua New Guinea, and concluded that the country was on high alert for an imminent incursion Recommendations were given to the National Agriculture Quarantine and Inspection Authority ( the country’s mandated Biosecurity and Veterinary service, on active reporting and surveillance, early detection, control and containment of ASF in the event of an incursion The Mission team, in collaboration with the NAQIA, the Department of Agriculture and Livestock (DAL and other relevant agencies and stakeholders, identified high risk entry pathways for ASF, namely the Indonesia and Papua New Guinea land borders, airports and seaports, through mining, logging and construction sites with Chinese or Asian contractors and/or workers The early detection of ASF was pertinent in the efficient and timely control and containment of the disease Given the high socio economic value of pigs in the country, particularly in the Highlands Region, it was imperative that an incursion be prevented and that ASF be kept out of this region Against this background, the project was designed to address gaps identified in the existing animal surveillance system in the NAQIA, and to strengthen the technical capacity of the NAQIA, the DAL and relevant agencies’ officers in active surveillance and reporting, diagnostics, and risk communication, to enable rapid detection and early containment of ASF incursion in the country.
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    Averting risks to the food chain 2017
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    Threats to our food, whether in the form of pathogen, insect or contaminant, are now spreading faster and further than ever before. Propelled by an array of global trends, their rapid transmission, in particular from country to country, makes effective and timely response more difficult. To address the rising number of transboundary animal and plant pests and diseases (including those that afflict aquatic life and forests), food safety and radiation threats, FAO established the Food Chain Crisis – Emergency Prevention System (FCC-EMPRES). Since 2008, new technologies, tools, manuals and guidelines have been developed to facilitate the detection, early warning, monitoring and assessment of threats. Calling for an integrated and interdisciplinary approach, FCC-EMPRES sees the collaboration of experts in animal and aquatic health, food safety, plant, and forest protection, nuclear techniques applied to agriculture, emergency response, and communication, at global, regional and country lev els. FAO makes a new monthly information sheet and quarterly early warning bulletin available to support member countries and institutions with transboundary threats to the food chain. Related links: http://www.fao.org/food-chain-crisis/home/en/ Topics: Food chain crisis - Emergency Prevention System (FCC-EMPRES) Download: http://www.fao.org/3/b-i6538e.pdf

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