Thumbnail Image

Food Price Monitoring and Analysis (FPMA) Bulletin #1, 10 February 2023

Monthly report on food price trends











Also available in:
No results found.

Related items

Showing items related by metadata.

  • Thumbnail Image
    Journal, magazine, bulletin
    Food Price Monitoring and Analysis (FPMA) Bulletin #10, 14 December 2022
    Monthly Report on Food Price Trends
    2022
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    International prices of wheat and maize fell in November, both influenced by the extension of the Black Sea Grain Initiative. Greater export competition and low demand for supplies from the United States of America contributed to the fall in wheat prices, while in the same country, improved logistics and higher seasonal availability also helped ease maize prices. By contrast, international rice prices moved up by another 2.3 percent in November, influenced by currency appreciations against the United States dollar in some Asian suppliers and good buying interest. According to FAO’s most recent analysis, domestic staple food prices sustained their year-on-year higher levels in November. In some regions, seasonal harvests and domestic policy interventions in favour of critical food and input markets abated the pressure on prices. Price transmission from global food and energy markets, amid widespread currency depreciation, continues to reinforce the upward trend of domestic prices and is expected to push the 2022 food import bills to record levels in many countries. Adverse weather events and market disruptions from conflict and civil unrest are other contributory factors to tight supply conditions and elevated domestic staple food prices.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Journal, magazine, bulletin
    Food Price Monitoring and Analysis (FPMA) Bulletin #3, 14 April 2023
    Monthly report on food price trends
    2023
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    International prices of all major cereals declined in March. World wheat prices fell significantly, reflecting ample supplies, strong export competition and the extension of the Black Sea Grain Initiative (BSGI). A mix of factors, including ongoing harvests in South America, expected record output in Brazil and currency depreciation in Argentina, led to a decline in maize prices. International rice prices also eased in March, weighed by ongoing or imminent harvests in major Asian exporters. FAO’s analysis of the latest available data shows domestic staple food prices, despite some declines, continue to be very high in many countries in March 2023. Seasonal harvest pressures in parts of East Asia and ample availability of wheat from major exporters in the CIS (Asia and Europe) supported month‑on‑month declines in some staple food prices. Conflict and civil insecurity remained an underlying driver of food price increases in Haiti, and parts of East and West Africa, while weather related shocks were key contributing factors in parts of East and Southern Africa. In many countries, currency weaknesses and high transport costs continue to support elevated prices of both domestically produced and imported food commodities.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Journal, magazine, bulletin
    Food Price Monitoring and Analysis (FPMA) Bulletin #2, 10 March 2023
    Monthly report on food price trends
    2023
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    After edging down for the past three months, international prices of wheat firmed marginally in February, mostly reflecting strong demand and concerns over dry weather conditions in some major exporters. World maize prices were nearly unchanged in February, with mixed price trends among the major exporters. International rice prices eased in February, amid exchange rate movements and a slowdown in trading activities in most major Asian exporters. Latest analysis by FAO shows that domestic staple food prices generally remained at elevated levels in February 2023. Seasonal factors and price transmission from the recent weakening of international grain prices supported month‑on‑month declines in some staple food prices in parts of East Asia, South America, Southern Africa and West Africa. Nonetheless, in many countries, conflict, adverse weather events and macroeconomic challenges, particularly currency weakness, continue to drive up local prices.

Users also downloaded

Showing related downloaded files

No results found.