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Possibility of local wood from a global perspective the environmental performance on wooden main stadium of Tokyo 2020

XV World Forestry Congress, 2-6 May 2022









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    Community forest certification and stakeholders cooperation: An inclusive approach to enhance community capacity while meeting market demand on sustainably-certified products
    XV World Forestry Congress, 2-6 May 2022
    2022
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    Community forestry has begun a way to manage forest by involving surrounding communities. Indonesia has 2.6 million hectares of community forest with potential wood stock 74.7 million m3 (Ministry of Forestry Statistical Report, 2014). It is also indicated that the amount of timber harvested by communities has increased during the last decade, reaching more than 5 million m3 annually. When the logs production from the community forest tends to increase, its wood stock sustainability becomes concern to some stakeholders. Further, community forest holders who are typically small scale operations also become a consideration in implementing community forest certification. The study focus on the approach of IFCC and PEFC in building community forest certification scheme as a tool to enhance community capacity in managing the forest whilst also as a market-based instrument by linking market demands of sustainably-certified products with its producers. IFCC[1] has developed the community forest certification system with its objective to cooperate with multi stakeholders in enhancing community capacity to manage forest sustainably and meet the market demand. The development of IFCC standard for community forest was implemented in manners that are open, transparent and consensus-based.


    [1] IFCC is an organization of scheme owner and developer of sustainable forest management in Indonesia which has been endorsed by Programme for the Endorsement of Forest Certification (PEFC) since 2014. Keywords: Adaptive and integrated management, Human health and well-being, Partnerships, Sustainable forest management, Value chain ID: 3484993
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    The green pathway to growth and sustainability: Sustainable management of rubber plantations
    XV World Forestry Congress, 2-6 May 2022
    2022
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    Vietnam Rubber Group (VRG) is the largest natural rubber producer, with over 410,000 ha located in Viet Nam, Laos, and Cambodia. VRG is always aware of the responsibility for a sustainable enterprise; VRG’s efforts demonstrate an excellent example in promoting rubber sustainability.
    VRG is the leading enterprise in implementing the Viet Nam Forest Certification Scheme (VFCS) and PEFC certificates in the rubber sector. In 2021, about 55,000 ha rubber plantations and 22 natural rubber processing factories were certified under the VFCS/PEFC standards; another 57,000 ha and 14 natural rubber processing factories will be certified by the end of 2021 and 300,000 ha certified by 2022.
    In economic terms, VRG rubber plantations have an average yield of 1.56 ton/ha/year, which is much higher than the global average yield, through the focusing on R&D and innovative solutions, especially: new high yielding rubber clones; advanced techniques in harvesting and soil protection; intercropping and Integrated Disease Management.
    VRG pays attention to environmental values by applying the best practices to reduce significant carbon emissions: increasing the use of organic fertilizers; installing solar power systems for rubber factories; developing new processing process to reduce 40% of electric usage and DO oil; using biological waste treatment; and reusing 1.5 million m3/year (25% of total water usage) of treated wastewater.
    VRG demonstrates the social responsibilities and has meaningful contributions to society by improving the living conditions of VRG workers and surrounding communities (infrastructure and health care facility improvement; job and income creation).
    VRG strongly considers sustainable development as the green pathway of the future and business growth; VRG looks forward to sharing the best practices and the importance of industry sustainability leadership. Keywords: Sustainable forest management, Agriculture, Deforestation and forest degradation ID: 3486754
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    Forest environmental tax as a scheme of sustainable forest management: potential and challenges in Japan
    XV World Forestry Congress, 2-6 May 2022
    2022
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    The Forest Environment Transfer Tax (FETT) was introduced in Japan in 2019 to support forest management at municipality level. Forest policy at prefectural level is influenced by the scheme as well. For example, 37 prefectures having prefectural forest environment tax cannot use their prefectural taxes for the measures which can be implemented using the FETT. They need to consider and explain the differences between FETT and their prefectural taxes. Furthermore, FETT is allocated not only to municipalities but to prefectures to support municipalities. Another major topic of FETT scheme is facilitation of urban and rural collaboration. Urban municipalities receive FETT as well as rural municipalities, and they can use it to facilitate the use of wood products to indirectly support national and regional forest management, and to conduct forest management in rural municipalities based on urban-rural collaboration. In this study, 37 prefectures were analyzed to identify the status of use of FETT. It reveals that most of the prefectures implement support of municipal surveys of forest owners. In addition, ordinance of a prefecture has been revised to avoid duplication of policies based on FETT and its prefectural tax. Furthermore, to analyze the urban-rural collaboration using FETT, collaboration of Toshima District in Tokyo and Chichibu City in Saitama were surveyed and analyzed. As results, the contexts, potentials, and challenges of their collaboration were identified. As a background of the collaboration, an officer of forest policy section in Saitama Prefecture was working on the FETT related measures as an officer of Chichibu City, which is an example of human resource sharing between prefectures and municipalities. The contexts of the urban-rural collaboration are; two of them have long-term collaboration as sister municipalities, and Chichibu is conducting regional forest management collaborating with surrounding municipalities. Keywords: Forest Environment Transfer Tax; Forest environmental tax; prefecture; municipality ID: 3486768

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