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Nutrition-sensitive voucher schemes in South Sudan

Improving diets while promoting the diversification of livelihoods and nutrition education in a protracted crisis










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    Brochure, flyer, fact-sheet
    Increasing water productivity for nutrition-sensitive agriculture and improved food security and nutrition 2021
    Good nutrition requires reliable access to safe soil and water for both food production and preparation as well as optimal sanitation and hygiene practices. Yet about one-third of the world’s population currently lives in water-stressed environments. Further, land degradation, water scarcity, flooding and less predictable rainfall patterns due to climate change are expected to undermine the productivity of smallholder farmers and exacerbate growing rates of malnutrition. Achieving Sustainable Development Goals (SDG) 2 (end hunger and all forms of malnutrition), 3 (good health and well-being), 6 (clean water and sanitation) and 15 (life on land) will therefore require interdisciplinary strategies that recognize the interconnections among these goals. FAO and IFAD aim to further these goals by implementing a three-year project, “Increasing water productivity for nutrition-sensitive agriculture and improved food security and nutrition”, in six pilot countries: Mozambique, Rwanda, Niger, Benin, Egypt and Jordan. As outlined in the project flyer, the overall objective of the project is to improve dietary quality and diversity through the agricultural production pathway by strengthening the capacity of smallholder farmers in these settings to adopt sustainable water, soil, and agronomic management practices. That is, the project aims to move beyond the traditional approach of “more nutrition per drop” to a more holistic framework of “more diverse nutrients and better economic prospects per drop”. In the proposed theory of change, implementation of these agricultural practices are anticipated to lead to greater dietary diversity and quality, improvements in health, and expanded livelihoods.
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    Policy brief
    Nutrition-sensitive agriculture water productivity
    Insights from field implementation
    2023
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    Good nutrition requires reliable access to safe soil and water for both food production and preparation as well as optimal sanitation and hygiene practices. Yet about one-third of the world’s population currently lives in water-stressed environments. Further, land degradation, water scarcity, flooding and less predictable rainfall patterns due to climate change are expected to undermine the productivity of smallholder farmers and exacerbate growing rates of malnutrition. Achieving Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) 2 (end hunger and all forms of malnutrition), 3 (good health and well-being), 6 (clean water and sanitation) and 15 (life on land) will therefore require interdisciplinary strategies that recognize the interconnections among these goals. Pursuant to these goals, FAO and IFAD are implementing a three-year project, “Increasing water productivity for nutrition-sensitive agriculture and improved food security and nutrition”, in six pilot countries: Mozambique, Rwanda, Niger, Benin, Egypt and Jordan. The overall objective of the project is to improve dietary quality and diversity through the agricultural production pathway by strengthening the capacities of smallholder farmers in these settings to adopt sustainable water, soil, and agronomic management practices. That is, the project aims to move beyond the traditional approach of “more nutrition per drop” to a more holistic framework of “more diverse nutrients and better economic prospects per drop”. The policy brief outlines insights from field implementation of the project in Benin, Mozambique and Niger, specifically the methodological approach, highlights from baseline surveys and next steps to ensure that the aforementioned agricultural practices lead to greater dietary quality and diversity, improvements in health, and expanded livelihoods.
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    Brochure, flyer, fact-sheet
    Nutrition-sensitive cash+ in Somalia
    Combining cash payments, nutrition education and provision of agricultural and livestock inputs to increase food security and improve diets of drought-affected pastoralists and farmers
    2020
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    In 2016 and 2017, a drought led to large-scale food insecurity across Somalia, affecting more than six million people, including over 900,000 children under the age of five likely to be acutely malnourished. Following the two-year drought, in 2018, heavy rains led to flooding in the southern part of the country. This severely affected farmers’ ability to cultivate during the following season. In response to this emergency, in 2018 the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) adopted a programmatic nutrition-sensitive Cash+ approach funded mainly by the World Bank through the “Somalia emergency drought response and recovery project”. This approach was further streamlined by the cash+ livestock projects funded by the Office of U.S. Foreign Disaster Assistance (OFDA). FAO’s Cash+ is a cash transfer modality that pairs unconditional cash transfers with productive inputs, assets and/or technical training, aimed at supporting beneficiaries to address immediate needs while also engaging in productive activities. Depending on the beneficiary groups, FAO provides Cash+ crop, livestock, or fish packages. In short, cash+ interventions seek to enhance the food security, nutrition and income generation potential of vulnerable households. Against this background, this promising practice explores how Cash+ model in Somalia can contribute to improving diets and food security of pastoralist and farming communities.

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