Thumbnail Image

Institutionalizing Farmer Field School approach: experiences from Latin America











Also available in:
No results found.

Related items

Showing items related by metadata.

  • Thumbnail Image
    Book (stand-alone)
    Introduction to Farmer Field Schools
    A Reader for Institutions of Higher Learning
    2019
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    The essence of farmer field schools (FFS) is to empower farmers to learn, understand, and make informed decisions. The FFS approach challenges conventional agricultural extension approaches, which are based on top-down delivery of technology packages. It is estimated that by 2015, millions of farmers and agro-pastoralists in the world had benefited from the unique ability of FFS programmes to address the technological, social and economic needs of smallholder farmers and land users. Because of this success, the demand for FFS programmes has been increasing, and in several countries, the approach is now institutionalized within public extension systems and NGO programmes. An output from an FFS workshop was a proposal by the stakeholders to develop a core reading material on FFS for use by universities as they undertake to institutionalize the approach in their institutions. The FFS Reader provides the audience with a common understanding of the salient aspects of the FFS approach. The document is not meant to be exhaustive but rather introduces the reader to the fundamentals of FFS methodology and provides specific references for further reading. It is expected that the document will contribute to the mainstreaming of participatory and experiential learning processes and knowledge on the FFS approach in tertiary education system in eastern Africa. It is also hoped that academia and especially students interested in researching or learning about FFS will find this Reader intellectually stimulating, informative and resourceful.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Book (stand-alone)
    A Shift In Global Perspective: Institutionalizing Farmer Field Schools 2015
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    The Farmer Field School (FFS) approach has been very successful and witnessed a strong expansion in many areas beyond crop production. Notwithstanding this success, the adoption of FFS in national extension often remains problematic and FFS activities have often been implemented in the margin of national institutions with strong reliance on donor funding. The creation of an enabling environment for institutional support is essential for expanding the effort, improving quality, and strengthening impact and continuity of the FFSs. This paper aims to analyse opportunities, challenges and implications of institutionalizing FFS at the national level.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Brochure, flyer, fact-sheet
    Good and promising practices. Integrating the methodologies of farmer field schools into universities’ curricula: The case of Kenya’s Pwani University 2021
    Also available in:

    Farmer Field School (FFS) was introduced by FAO and partners more than 30 years ago as an alternative to the prevailing top-down extension approach. FFS promotes farm-based experimentation, group organization, and local decision-making through discovery-based learning methods. FFS involves season-long learning of field-based groups of 25 to 30 farmers, who meet regularly to learn through discovery, experimentation, and share the experience. FFS combines local and scientific knowledge and aims at making farmers better decision-makers. Whereas the conventional technology transfer approach focuses primarily on developing and transforming technologies that work for farmers, the FFS approach, on the other hand, empowers farmers to become better decision-makers towards developing or adapting technologies that work and are acceptable to them. Farmers, agro-pastoralists, and fisherfolk worldwide have benefited from the unique ability of FFS programs to address their technological, social, and economic needs. As a result of this success, the demand for FFS programs continues to increase. In some countries like Kenya, the approach is institutionalized in extension systems and NGO programs. Since then, member countries in the Eastern African subregion have expressed their interest in scaling up existing FFS initiatives and integrating the methodology in national extension policies, strategies, and programs. In response to this need, the FAO Subregional Office for Eastern Africa (SFE) developed a project, titled, “Institutionalization of Field Schools (FS) in Extension Curricula of Institutions of Higher Learning in Eastern Africa”, aimed at developing and putting into practice a contextualized and practical approach to mainstream FFS into the agricultural extension.

Users also downloaded

Showing related downloaded files

No results found.