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Soils, where food begins

Outcome document of the Global Symposium on soils for nutrition, 26–29 July 2022








FAO. 2023. Soils, where food begins. Outcome document of the Global Symposium on soils for nutrition 26-29 July 2022. Rome.



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    Book (stand-alone)
    Soils, where food begins
    Proceedings of the Global Symposium on soils for nutrition, 26–29 July 2022
    2023
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    The book of proceedings of the GSOIL4N contains the papers presented during the

    Global Symposium on Soils for Nutrition

    that was held from 26 to 29 July 2022. The papers provide the latest research findings and multisectoral insights which evidenced that nutrient imbalance is a global and crosscutting threat with multifactorial drivers and effects on the agrifood systems and even on key planetary processes.
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    Book (stand-alone)
    Soils for nutrition: state of the art 2022
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    Food starts with soils, and as the target date to accomplish the SDGs grows closer, it is more urgent than ever to reverse soil degradation and tackle its effects on agrifood systems. This booklet aims to review the role of soil fertility in producing sufficient, safe, and more nourishing food for healthier plants, animals, and people. It also offers recommendations for solutions that can provide a more nutritious agrifood system for enhancing human health and wellbeing while protecting the environment. Soil fertility and nutrition involve processes at scales ranging from molecules to the entire planet. Our interventions in these processes may exacerbate the global challenges we face but can also be modified to solve them. This booklet contributes to understanding processes related to soil fertility from the perspectives of food production and food security, and the environmental and climate change impacts associated with fertilizer misuse and overuse. The booklet also outlines the main areas of opportunity and the way forward to solve the nutrient imbalance prevailing in our current agrifood systems.
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    Journal, magazine, bulletin
    Soils, where food begins: how can soils continue to sustain the growing need for food production in the current fertilizer crisis?
    ITPS Soil Letters #6
    2023
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    Soils are directly and indirectly involved in the provision of most ecosystem services vital for humans, including food production, which is fundamental for food security and sovereignty. Soils are the basis for producing more than 95 percent of our food. However, one-third of the world’s soils are degraded to some extent due to erosion, loss of organic carbon and biodiversity, salinization, acidification, compaction, and nutrient imbalance, among other causes. This ITPS Soil Letters reflects on the close link between soil degrading processes and fertility loss and proposes a portfolio of solutions focused on soil health with the ultimate goal of achieving food security.

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