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BCC-FAO Regional Workshop on Assessing Climate Change Vulnerability in Fisheries and Aquaculture











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    Book (series)
    Climate change implications for fisheries of the Benguela current region
    Making the best of change. FAO/Benguela Current Commission Workshop 1–3 November 2011, Windhoek, Namibia
    2012
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    These Proceedings include (1) the Report of and (2) the background papers prepared for the Workshop on Climate change implications for fisheries of the Benguela Current region: making the best of change. The Workshop was hosted by the Benguela Current Commission (BCC) in Windhoek, Namibia, from 1 to 3 November 2011, and financed through a Japanese-funded, and Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO)-implemented, project on Climate Change, fisheries and Aquaculture: Understan ding the Consequences as a Basis for Planning and Implementing Suitable Responses and Adaptation Strategies (GCP/INT/253/JPN), in collaboration with BCC. Presentation topics included: the regional biophysical features and decadal trends in the Benguela Current Large Marine Ecosystem (BCLME); national contexts of climate variability and change and fisheries; and a vulnerability assessment of the region’s fisheries. Discussions largely focused on: aspects of developing a methodology for vulnerabil ity assessment; definition of vulnerability in a fisheries context; potential climate change impacts on, and vulnerability levels of, the different fisheries in the region; and potential short- and medium-term adaptation actions. The Workshop recommended that a regional programme be developed with the aim of reducing vulnerability and increasing adaptive capacity of the social-ecological fisheries systems of the BCLME, primarily focusing on: (1) establishing/improving national and regional inter -agency collaboration and communication to facilitate responses and action in relation to climate change; (2) develop a holistic and coherent methodology for vulnerability assessment of fisheries; (3) development and implementation of pilot projects to develop and test anticipatory and responsive actions, providing for lesson learning/sharing and improvements.
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    Book (stand-alone)
    Report of the FAO/PaCFA Expert Workshop on Assessing Climate Change Vulnerability in Fisheries and Aquaculture: Available Methodologies and their Relevance for the Sector
    Windhoek, Namibia, 8–10 April 2013
    2013
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    The purpose of the global Expert Workshop on Assessing Climate Change Vulnerability in Fisheries and Aquaculture: Available Methodologies and their Relevance for the Sector was to review latest stages in research on, and the application of, climate variability and change vulnerability methodologies. It also provided an opportunity to begin a common reflection on what role these methodologies can have in planning policies and strategies to best cope with climate change impacts on fisheries and aq uaculture. Making the link between expert advice and practical use of vulnerability methodologies from around the globe set the scene for fruitful discussions on how to make the best use of the existing information, how to prioritize the filling of gaps and how to develop a common understanding on the effectiveness of such knowledge in relation to policy and management actions and programmes. As vulnerability methodologies are a function of different factors (vulnerability of what and of whom to what), the workshop required experts from across the natural and social sciences disciplines and from both inland and marine capture fisheries and aquaculture. These examined current methodologies for conducting vulnerability assessments and provided best practices on how to develop and undertake a vulnerability assessment for incorporation into the design of adaptation programmes in fisheries and aquaculture in the face of climate change.
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    Community-level socio-ecological vulnerability assessments in the Benguela Current Large Marine Ecosystem 2015
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    Climate change is considered one of the most critical challenges facing the planet and humankind. It poses a key threat to marine ecosystems and fisheries resources as well as communities that depend on these systems for food and livelihoods. Understanding the vulnerability of these socio-ecological systems to climate change, and their capacity to adapt, has become the focus of several climate change and fisheries projects and programmes in recent years and, increasingly, researchers and practit ioners recognise that actions supporting adaptive capacity building have to be grounded in local needs and experiences and thus vulnerability assessments should be participatory and inclusive. A good understanding of local vulnerabilities, including local perceptions of the multiple drivers of change, historic and customary adaptation strategies, and existing capacity within local institutions and amongst individuals, should be used as building blocks for strengthening resilience and identifying appropriate adaptation strategies. Participatory vulnerability assessment is an approach that facilitates better understanding of the extent to which a socio-ecological system (e.g. coastal fishery system) is susceptible to various socio-ecological changes (including the effects of climate change) and the system’s capacity to cope with and adapt to these changes from the viewpoint of the local communities. This analysis will help countries, partner agencies and their staff, researchers and fish eries professionals in understanding how to define and measure vulnerability within complex fisheries systems, using perceptions-based approaches within fishing communities in the Benguela Current region (Angola, Namibia, South Africa) as an example. Ultimately, the scope of this work is to improve resilience of fisheries systems and dependent communities to multiple drivers of change including climate change and ocean acidification.

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