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Making public investments Paris Agreement-aligned in a cost-effective way

Calculating marginal abatement cost curves for agricultural investments











Ilicic, J., Maestripieri, L., Dobrovich, G., Ignaciuk, A. & Rottem, A. 2024. Making public investments Paris Agreement-aligned in a cost-effective way – Calculating marginal abatement cost curves for agricultural investments. FAO Agricultural Development Economics Working Paper, 24-02. Rome, FAO.




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