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Concept Note for the 4th FAO/OIE Sub-Regional Meeting of GF-TADs for SPC Members

Fiji, 28-30 November 2017










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    Meeting
    Pacific Regional Assessment for the FAO Voluntary Guidelines on Responsible Governance of Tenure of Land and other Natural Resources 2010
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    FAO (Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations) and other development partners are working together with countries to prepare Voluntary Guidelines that will provide practical guidance to states, civil society, the private sector, donors and development specialists on the responsible governance of tenure. By setting out principles and internationally accepted standards for responsible practices, the Voluntary Guidelines will provide a framework and point of reference that stakeholde rs can use when developing their own policies and actions. Regional Consultations on the proposed Voluntary Guidelines are an important part of the process. They bring together regional representative, multidisciplinary groups to assess regional priorities and issues that should be considered when the Voluntary Guidelines are an important part of the process. They bring together regionally representative, multidisciplinary groups to assess regional priorities and issues that should be considered when the Voluntary Guidelines are drafted. The regional consultation for the Pacific Islands was hosted by the Government of Samoa, and was opened by Mr Taulealeausumai Laavasa Malua, Chief Executive Officer, Ministry of Natural Resources and Environment, Samoa. The consultation was co-organized by the University of South Pacific, the Secretariat of the Pacific Community, and the FAO Subregional Office for the Pacific Islands. It was attended by 43 people, from 12 Pacific countries, who combine d their broad range of expertise to identify the issues contained in the assessment for the Pacific Region. Participants were drawn from the public sector, civil society, private sector and academia, and came from Australia, Cook Islands, Fiji, Kiribati, Nauru, New Zealand, Palau, Samoa, Solomon Islands, Tonga, Tuvalu and Vanuatu. In addition, people from the Federated States of Micronesia, Niue and Papua New Guinea were invited but were unable to attend.
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    Book (series)
    Depleted marine resources: an approach to quantification based on the FAO capture database. 2004
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    The 2002 United Nations World Summit on Sustainable Development called for species whose catches had been drastically depleted to be restored to health within 2015. An approach is proposed here to a preliminary classification, based solely on information included in the FAO capture database. Three criteria were used to filter catch data: the trend in recent years, the long-term trend, and the extent of decline in catches over the long term. These were applied sequentially to the data series for species items by fishing area recorded in the FAO capture database. About ten percent of the species items examined matched the selecting criteria. This is the same proportion of stocks classified as “depleted” by FAO based on assessment data although there are differences in the species identified. Reasons for these discrepancies are discussed. The species groups with the highest percentages of species matching the three criteria were Gadiformes, molluscs (excluding cephalopods) and miscellan eous coastal and demersal fishes. Pelagic fishes (including Clupeoids) and crustaceans showed low percentages of depleted resources. Species considered depleted by this procedure are listed by FAO fishing area.
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    Book (stand-alone)
    GF-TADs Strategy for 2021–2025
    Enhancing control of transboundary animal diseases for global health
    2021
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    Since 2004, the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) and the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) have cooperated in the Global Framework for the Progressive Control of Transboundary Animal Diseases (GF-TADs) to reduce the threat from transboundary animal diseases (TADs) to food security, livelihoods and safe trade. The GF-TADs is a coordination mechanism established to safeguard its Members from repeated incursions of infectious animal disease epidemics, to enhance safe trade in animals and animal products, and to improve food and nutrition security by reducing the damaging effects of TADs. To reach these long-term goals, the GF-TADs Strategy for 2021−2025 aims to enhance the control of TADs through the establishment of priority TADs strategies at the regional and sub-regional level, by developing the capacity to prevent and control TADs, and by improving the sustainability of priority TADs strategies through multi-disciplinary partnerships. The ultimate goals of the global strategy are to improve food security and nutrition, to reduce poverty and to enhance safe trade in livestock and animal products by reducing repeated incursions and the further spread of infectious disease epidemics. The GF-TADs Strategy was developed through a ‘Theory of Change’ model and is described as a series of objectives. Chapters describe the management of the GF-TADs Strategy, resource mobilization and a framework for monitoring and evaluation, with clear indicators. In addition, the strategy provides an overview of the GF-TADs governance model and its global priority diseases.

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