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Volume yield, tree species diversity and carbon storage of sacred groves in Southwestern Nigeria

XV World Forestry Congress, 2-6 May 2022









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    Assessing tree succession, species diversity and carbon sequestration potentials in off-reserve secondary forests for REDD+ implementation in Ghana
    XV World Forestry Congress, 2-6 May 2022
    2022
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    Ghana is losing its primary forest, mostly forest reserves at an alarming rate. Secondary forests play a vital role in tropical landscapes, but few studies exist to assess their regeneration pathways and carbon sequestration in Ghana. We sought to find out the regeneration potentials, species diversity and carbon stocks accumulation of off-reserve secondary forests in the Moist Semi-deciduous and Dry Semi-deciduous zones. Four age classes were studied; 0-5, 6-10, 11-15 and 15+ years. Four plots with three replications were used for each age class. Nested plots were chosen; 33 m x 33 m for trees (dbh≥ 5 cm) 10 m x 10 m for saplings (≥1m tall and dbh <5cm) and 2 m x 2 m for seedlings. Age had significant differences in tree (dbh≥ 5 cm) density and basal area between the sites but not on sapling and seedling densities. A total of 129 tree species with dbh ≥5cm belonging to 95 genera and 40 families were identified. Mean Shannon-Weiner diversity index of trees (dbh ≥ 5cm) was 3.6±0.2 and 3.3±0.3 for the Moist Semi-deciduous and Dry Semi-deciduous zones respectively. Both age and forest site had significant effect on aboveground carbon accumulation with age of forest having more significance than climatic conditions. Age of a secondary forest has more effect on the species composition than climate. The secondary forest depicts the characteristic of young growth where the tree densities of most trees are confined to dbh= 5- 10cm in both zones and the potential of rapid recovery of species and carbon accumulation represents an important source of timber and carbon sink. The strong presence of regeneration portrays the potential for carbon sequestration under Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and forest Degradation (REDD+) if secondary forests are managed well in Ghana. Collaborative management of secondary forests with farmers and good forest polices can help Ghana achieve benefits such as timber, woodfuel, and carbon to participate in REDD+. Keywords: [Deforestation and forest degradation, REDD+, secondary forest, Climate change, Landscape management]\ ID: 3617260
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    Biodiversity and carbon sequestration assessments for wetland management framework in the wetlands in Bangladesh for climate mitigation and adaptation
    XV World Forestry Congress, 2-6 May 2022
    2022
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    The wetlands of Bangladesh are biologically diversified having a wide range of ecosystems ranging from northern region’s Haor to Mangrove forests of coastal zone of the country. Among these wetlands, there are two RAMSAR sites; Tanguar Haor and The Sundarbans. An updated inventory of the biodiversity and tree carbon stock is a timely demand as the climate mitigation and biodiversity conservation is of high significance in Bangladesh. This studies objective is to assess the floral (tree) diversity and above ground carbon stock per hector in and around the wetlands along with a wetland management framework for Bangladesh. this study uses both qualitative and quantitative method. This study adopts a nested plot inventory method to assess biodiversity assessment (diversity and evenness index) and carbon stock assessment. A total of 190 plots were taken in three different types of wetlands: 50 plots in Tangoar Haor, 50 plots in Kaptai Lake, 20 plots in Baikka Beel, 20 plots in Ratargul swamp forest and 50 plots in Hakaluki Haor. Additionally, 300 personal interviews along with 40 FGDs were carried out to obtain the people’s perception on biodiversity status in context of previous time. The study reveals that, the Shannon indexes for Tanguar Haor, Kaptai Lake, Baikka Beel, Ratargul swamp forest and Hakaluki Haor are 0.517, 0.779, 0.687, 0.279 and 0.828 respectively. It shows that the Ratargul have low biodiversity, whereas Hakaluki haor have higher biodiversity. Secondly the tree above ground carbon stocks tons per hectors for Tanguar Haor, Kaptai Lake, Baikka Beel, Ratargul swamp forest and Hakaluki Haor are 25.929, 59.210, 28.767, 31.538 and 33.587. The social data i.e., interview and FGD indicates a declining trend of tree species diversity in comparison past. The study results also provide comprehensive management framework involving malty level stakeholders for wetlands of Bangladesh. Keywords: Biodiversity conservation, Adaptive and integrated management, Climate change ID: 3486762
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    Promoting Terminalia brownii as a commercial indigenous tree species in drylands, East Africa
    XV World Forestry Congress, 2-6 May 2022
    2022
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    Kenya’s forest cover is estimated at 7.4% of the land mass cover. Forests are important in ensuring biodiversity conservation and providing ecosystem goods and services, improving community livelihoods and national GDP. There is need to enhance afforestation and reforestation programmes to achieve the envisioned 10% tree cover target. However, this effort is constrained by climate change issues arising from unsustainable exploitation of wood for charcoal and firewood leading to the depletion of important tree species such as T. brownii. The domestication of T. brownii under agroforestry systems and other tree planting programmes are constrained by lack of adequate supply of superior and high quality seeds and seedlings, poor silvi-cultural management techniques, low rates of integration into smallholder agroforestry programs, limited knowledge on crop-tree interactions and lack of allometric models to estimate biomass yield and carbon stock. A multidisciplinary research project funded by the National Research Fund (NRF) is ongoing and is geared towards promoting the propagation and regeneration of T. brownii under agroforestry systems in the drylands of Kenya to mitigate climate change. A number of preliminary findings have been reported, such are; (1) Terminalia brownii fruits have mechanical dormancy imposed by the hard samara fruit and that extracted T. brownii seeds record a high percentage of above 80% under warm conditions; (2) germination of T. brownii fruits and seeds are significantly affected by fungal pathogens and insect pests; (3) five variables significantly influence the decision to domesticate T. brownii these are; education level of household head, importance of farm to the household income, access to credit, dependency ratio and intercropping; (4) studies on the spatial distribution and occurrence and development of allometric equation for estimating above and below-ground biomass of T. brownii in the drylands of Kenya are ongoing. Further assessment on growth performance have shown that T. brownii is generally fast growing; can attain an increase in height of (~1.0 m) and DGL (3.0 cm) annually, with significance difference in growth within and between provenances and that the it can withstand many other growth challenges despite the harsh weather conditions. These findings suggest that T. brownii is a promising tree species in agroforestry systems and afforestation in drylands and that there exist genetic variability among the available provenances thus the need to involve more stakeholders in seedling production and to embark on...... Key words: T. brownii, Commercial tree, growth performance, drylands of Kenya ID: 3623166

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