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Mini ponds for resource poor households to provide supplementary irrigation during drought spells in rainfed areas of NW-Bangladesh








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    Water conservation ponds in Nepal 2011
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    In Nepal, increasingly irregular rainfall patterns have been affecting the livelihoods of Nepalese farmers. Households face water shortages during the pre-monsoon season, between March and May, as well as during post-monsoon and winter, between October and February. In this context, it is essential to guarantee water supply throughout the year in order to reduce vulnerability of farmers caused by erratic rainfall patterns. Water conservation ponds prove a strategic adaptation practice, collecting rain water and replenishing groundwater reserves during the monsoon, as well as preventing excessive erosion and surface runoff down landslides slopes. In addition, the availability of water during dry season is key for traditional rural livelihoods, such as livestock and crop cultivation, as well as in the development of new activities, providing habitat for fish-raising. Additional advantages include the stabilization and re-vegetation of gullies, water availability for cultivation of small-scale fodder, vegetables and fruit trees along the boundaries of the pond, irrigation of kitchen gardens during dry periods and manure from dredged silt.
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    Establishing block and polybag mini nurseries in drought prone areas of north-western Bangladesh 2012
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    Most farmers in Bangladesh depend on subsistence farming with extremely small land holdings. Great parts of Bangladesh are flooded every year; to large extent agriculture systems have been adapted to this normal flooding. However, besides normal peak floods in July and August and late floods extending in September, early floods from May to June have negative impacts on food crop production potentials. As the country is already deficient in food, large damages of food crops due to floods and droughts may endanger food availability and local stability of supply. Crop diversification is advocated at the policy level to ensure food, nutritional and environment security. Farmers are interested in alternative small-scale economical activities such as seedling/sapling production which contribute to livelihood diversification and help overcome difficult periods in case the main crops were damaged by natural hazards.
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    Community seedbed for rice in drought prone areas of Bangladesh 2012
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    Choosing the optimum time for transplanting is a most essential prerequisite for rice cultivation, to ensure proper and optimal growth of plants and increase the yield and to synchronize cultivation practices for irrigation and control of pest, diseases or rats. T. aman (transplanted aman) rice is planted under rain fed conditions during the monsoon season. In case of drought, t. aman rice cultivation suffers significant damages, which can cause increase in prices for staple food, and increase risk of seasonal food shortages. Therefore, timely transplantation is essential to secure higher production. Community participation and collective action in cultivating rice are especially important in areas regularly prone to natural hazards such as north-western Bangladesh. This practice is designed to facilitate and promote community - based joint seedling production of t. aman rice to ensure timely availability of seedlings to all community members for early transplantation, and thus contributing to timely growing of plants and increasing yields.

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