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Cassava as animal feed in Ghana: past, present and future








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    Cassava processing: cassava wet flour 2006
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    Cassava (Manihot Esculenta Crantz) is the third most important source of calories in the tropics, after rice and maize. Millions of people depend on cassava in Africa, Asia and Latin America. It is grown by poor farmers, many of them women, often on marginal land. For those people and their families, cassava is vital for both food security and income generation. Cassava is a raw material base for an array of processed products that could effectively increase demand for cassava and contribute to agricultural transformation and economic growth in developing countries. The following technology describes how to obtain cassava flour from cassava tubers.
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    Project
    Creating Jobs and Generating Income in Rural Areas of Mozambique through Cassava Production and Processing - GCP/MOZ/120/EC 2020
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    Although cassava is the most widely consumed starch in Mozambique, providing up to 30 percent of daily calorie intake, the country’s cassava processing industry remains weak, relying mainly on manual processing and posing a challenge for the value chain. With a number of barriers to a sound cassava processing industry in place in the country, such as low productivity levels and poor logistics, crucial measures were needed in order to make the crop commercially viable. In this context, the project targeted the two districts of Massingir and Mabalane, Gaza Province. Its overall objective was to promote the entire cassava value chain in order to drive micro-, small and medium-sized enterprises to contribute to poverty reduction through income generation opportunities in rural areas of Mozambique. In order to achieve this, emphasis was placed on three specific objectives, namely (i) increased productivity of cassava through farmer training and the improvement of access to good planting material, (ii) improved quality of cassava production and (iii) integration of smallholder farmers into the value chain and access to the cassava market. These objectives, in turn, were to be achieved through areas such as improved post-harvest handling techniques among farmers, the facilitation of district platforms and an enhanced capacity among farmers for organizational management, storage and commercialization.
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    Brochure, flyer, fact-sheet
    Protecting cassava, a neglected crop, from pests and diseases 2019
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    Cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) is the fifth most produced staple food crop in the world, being a basic source of staple food for an estimated 800 million people worldwide. Cassava is an increasingly popular crop. Cassava is grown by smallholder farmers in more than 100 tropical and subtropical countries of Africa, Asia and Latin America. Thanks to its efficient use of water and soil nutrients and tolerance to drought, cassava can produce reasonable yields using limited or no inputs, even in areas with poor soils and unpredictable rainfall. Like other crops, cassava is vulnerable to pests and diseases that can cause heavy yield losses. Insect pests such as white flies and mealybugs, and diseases caused by viruses and phytoplasma, affect the production of cassava worldwide. Of the viral diseases, Cassava mosaic disease (CMD) and Cassava brown streak disease (CBSD) are the most widespread, severely affecting at least 50 percent of cassava crops in Africa. CMD and CBSD pose a serious threat to the food security of 135 million people in Central and East Africa alone. At least half of all plantings in Africa are affected by one of these diseases. Scientists estimate that annually, 15–24 percent (equivalent to approximately 12–23 million tonnes) of the crop is lost due only to CMD in Africa.

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