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Aquaculture and poverty: past, present and future prospects of impact







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    Literature Review of Studies on Poverty in Fishing Communities and of Lessons Learned in Using the SLA in Poverty Alleviation Strategies and Projects 2002
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    This report presents the findings of a literature review on various aspects of poverty in fisheries and on lessons learned of poverty alleviation measures including the Sustainable Livelihoods Approach (SLA). The review was conducted on behalf of the DFID/FAO SFLP. The principal findings indicate that there are few studies and analyses on the extent and causes of poverty in fishing communities and on the contribution of the fisheries sector to poverty alleviation and food security. There is al so limited understanding on the impact on poverty of technological change, community and fishers’ organizations, and alternative fisheries management regimes. On the policy side, the review found that while government but especially donor-supported programmes often seek to reduce poverty in fishing communities, they are rarely targeted on the poor. While empirical evidence is still very limited, the SLA is an improvement over conventional sectoral approaches for combating poverty in fishing comm unities.
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    Cassava as animal feed in Ghana: past, present and future 2013
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    The study on the use of cassava as animal feed in Ghana was commissioned as part of FAO’s initiative supporting poverty reduction in northern part of the country. Cassava (Manihot esculenta) is one of the main staple food crops grown by almost all farming families in Ghana, contributing to large proportion of daily calorie intake of the population. It is used to prepare fufu, the local popular dish, and considered as the poor man’s food. Ghana is the fourth largest cassava grower in Africa, afte r Nigeria, Democratic Republic of Congo and Angola. In 2010, Ghana produced 13.5 million tons of cassava. Available information suggests that, cassava is cultivated by over 90 percent of the farming population and contributes to 22 percent to the agricultural GDP, making it the right target for the fight against poverty in the country. The multi-purpose use of cassava as food for humans and animals, making various industrial products, including its use as input for breweries, attracted many pr ojects and programmes working on its value chain in Ghana. These projects, particularly the IFAD funded Root and Tuber Improvement Programme, introduced improved varieties for better yield, reduced post-harvest losses, improved agro-processing and better access to markets, etc. The various interventions enhanced production and marketing of cassava in the country improving income of producers and other actors involved in the value chain and generating more employment for women and youth, contribu ting in this way to poverty reduction. FAO, with its comparative advantage of promoting agricultural and food production and rural development, is supporting poverty reduction initiatives in Ghana. In particular, FAO through its Strategic Objective three is implementing an initiative targeting reduction of rural poverty in Northern Ghana.
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    The State of Food and Agriculture 2015 (SOFA): Social Protection and Agriculture: Breaking the Cycle of Rural Poverty 2015
    Despite significant progress in meeting the Millennium Development Goals on poverty and hunger, almost a billion people still live in extreme poverty (less than $1.25 per person per day) and 795 million still suffer from chronic hunger. Much more will have to be done to achieve the new Sustainable Development Goals on eradicating poverty and hunger by 2030. Most of the extreme poor live in rural areas of developing countries and depend on agriculture for their livelihoods. They are so poor and m alnourished that their families live in a cycle of poverty that passes from generation to generation. Many developing countries are adopting a successful new strategy for breaking the cycle of rural poverty – combining social protection and agricultural development. Social protection measures such as cash benefits for widows and orphans and guaranteed public works employment for the poor can protect vulnerable people from the worst deprivation. It can allow households to increase and diversify t heir diets. It can also help them save and invest on their own farms and or start new businesses. Agricultural development programmes that support small family farms in accessing markets and managing risks can create employment opportunities that make these families more self-reliant and resilient. Social protection and agricultural development, working together, can break the cycle of rural poverty.

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