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Monitoring and Evaluation Mission Report

GCP/RAF/466/EC SmartFish Project











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    Book (series)
    Environmental management and environmental impact assessment in aquaculture: Training Workshop for aquaculture managers. Entebbe, Uganda
    GCP/RAF/466/EC SmartFish Project
    2013
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    The overall objective of the SmartFish programme is to contribute to an increased level of social, economic and environmental development and deeper regional integration in the Eastern-Southern Africa and Indian Ocean Region (ESA-IO), through the sustainable exploitation of fisheries resources. The programme is funded by the European Union under the 10th European Development Fund and is implemented under the overall responsibility of the Indian Ocean Commission. Within the framework of SmartFish Result 5, Output 5M3.1, improved Environmental Management and Environmental Impact Assessment in Aquaculture (EIAA) was identified as a means by which sustainable benefits from aquaculture can be ensured. The regional training workshop was organized for SmartFish beneficiary countries with the objective of enabling them to improve country application and compliance of environmental impact assessment and environmental management of aquaculture, which would in turn help them foster sustainable de velopment. All SmartFish member countries participated in the organization of the workshop, from the assessment of training needs, to the design of the training programme, through to the training itself. Based on the findings from the initial needs assessment exercise, the workshop targeted national aquaculture managers. Findings from the needs assessment suggested focusing on improving practical knowledge and skills to address the following topics:  Aquaculture inputs and resources;  Aquacult ure outputs and impacts;  Why undertake environmental management;  Site selection and estimating capacity;  Modeling aquaculture impact;  Environmental regulations and their application;  EIAA components and process;  Environmental Management planning;  Environmental monitoring;  Strategic Environmental Assessment. The training sessions involved active discussions and practical exercises, which included field tours and case studies. In the case studies, participants evaluated pond and ca ge based aquaculture investments within the context of EIAA. They took into account the technical aspects, as well as the socio-economic and ecosystem requirements and impacts likely to arise from aquaculture. The evaluation of case studies followed steps based on recommended best practices from EIAA and Environmental Management Procedures (EMP). 5 The steps below show how participants undertook the review of their case studies:  Evaluation of the business plan;  EIAA screening process;  Ide ntification of main issues likely to arise, including identification of key stakeholders, stakeholder consultation exercises (done during field visit) and risk analysis of the main issues;  Identification of data requirements for analysis, evaluation and monitoring;  Identification of mitigation measures;  Presentation of findings that were outlined as EIAA and EMP to the departments of Environment and Aquaculture1 for final evaluation, approval and licensing. At the end of the workshop, part icipants expressed the value of working together with all relevant stakeholders. Aquaculture as an enterprise is cross-cutting and EIAA and EMPs cannot be implemented effectively by primary departments alone. Moreover, participants were able to identify the key issues in their respective countries, and the appropriate practical steps needed to be put in place, which would enable them to become more effective in EIAA considering both their national and local conditions. The following were identif ied by participants as being the gaps for which additional support would be required in order to improve levels of effective implementation of EIAA in the region:  Specialized training that targets managers (both in aquaculture and environmental institutions), practitioners and the general public, focusing on building skills and improving levels of public awareness.  Building the capacity of the various public institutions and the private sector, through building Public-Private-Partnerships, i n order to implement EIAA and better manage the general environmental issues of aquaculture. The following proposals were put forward: the development and production of user manuals for the different audiences; the provision of field and laboratory equipment; undertaking Strategic Environmental Assessments; setting up specialized EIAA units within departments; and, establishing effective functional linkages between key departments, notably the National Environmental Management Agencies and Fishe ries aquaculture institutions. Information management systems should also be looked at.  Development and/or improvement of general and specific national policies, regulations, strategies and guidelines, including their implementation.  Adoption of environmentally friendly systems and practices at all times.
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    Book (stand-alone)
    Regional fish trade in Eastern and Southern Africa: products and markets. A Fish Traders Guide 2012
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    Fish Trade is a major commodity exchange that makes fish to be the cheapest source of animal protein in Eastern and Southern Africa, particularly within the Great Lakes Region. The countries within the Eastern and Southern Africa and Indian Ocean (ESA-IO) Region agreed to a common strategy to increase the level of social, economic and environmental development and deepen regional integration through the sustainable exploitation of fisheries resources. The Program for Implementation of a Regional Fisheries Strategy (IRFS Program) for ESA-IO was launched in February 2011 with Regional Fisheries Trade as one of the five components. The other four components are Fisheries governance, Fisheries management, Monitoring, Control and Surveillance and Food Security. IRFS Program is coordinated by the Indian Ocean Commission (IOC) on behalf of the Member States within the ESA-IO region. Fish trade across borders or frontiers is an old profession in Africa, which was done to facilitate distant com munities to access fish, which was mainly in smoked and sundried/salted form. Trade in East and Southern Africa has increased to cover countries within and outside the region, providing the population with access to fish preserved and processed through industrial and artisanal methods. The range of products has also expanded to include chilled, frozen, and canned fishery products in addition to fresh, salted, sundried, smoked and deep-fried products. The market outlets have also grown from the s olitary fish monger to specialised agents, specialised fish shops, retail stores and supermarkets, restaurants and hotels. The consumers’ demand for better quality products brings on board the quality and safety issue prompting the countries to establish Sanitary and Phytosanitary standards for fish and fishery products. Harmonising trade measures provides a freer market for Fish Traders within the same trade or economic bloc. It also provides opportunities for bilateral arrangements between nei ghbouring countries in dissimilar trade blocs. The conditions under which the regional fish trade operates vary from countries with moderate infrastructure, established measures, well packaged and labelled consignments to those with rudimentary facilities, inadequate measures, and poorly transacted business with high Illegal, Unreported and Unregulated fish trade. The Fish Traders Guide primarily focuses on freshwater fishes from the Great Lakes region. It provides information on the various asp ects of the different fish types or species, fishery products and markets to enable the fish trader to plan and make informed decision. The guide encourages the trader to conduct legal trade and seek technical advice from relevant authorities. It also provides tips on qualities of a successful fish trader and successful business. The guide is neither a legal document nor an instruction material. However, it is a sensitisation instrument to promote responsible fish trading practices. It is IOC ai m to promote wise-use of the fisheries resources, increase in per capita fish consumption and increased accessibility of fish and fishery products by the population within the ESA-IO region. Responsible fish trading practices adhere to the FAO Code of Conduct for Responsible Fisheries, which is central to the sustainability of fisheries resources. Good trading practices discourage illegal fishing methods and promote optimal utilisation of the catches through value addition, improved processing a nd reduction of post-harvest losses.
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    Book (stand-alone)
    Comprehensive review of MCS Capacity in the ESA-IO Region 2012
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    Illegal Unreported and Unregulated (IUU) fishing is a severe global problem and one of the main obstructions to the achievement of sustainable fisheries that results in loss of revenue, jobs and livelihoods. The countries of the Southern and Eastern Africa and the Indian Ocean Region (ESA-IO) are particularly hampered with IUU fishing and one of the limiting factors in overcoming IUU fishing is lack of adequate human and institutional capacity and equipment in the area of monitoring, control and surveillance (MCS). The problem of IUU fishing has been acknowledged in various policy commitments that are in force in the region with pledges made to fight it. The SmartFish programme is an initiative set up to promote regional integration through practical implementation of sound fisheries initiatives. It has a strong component on MCS and within this area has undertaken this comprehensive review of the capacity required to implement effective MCS at a national and regional level in order to provide recommendations for how the SmartFish programme can assist in filling these gaps in MCS capacity. The review focused on seven countries (Comoros, Kenya, Madagascar, Mauritius the Seychelles, Somalia and the United Republic of Tanzania) in order to analysis and benchmark the MCS capacity and to identify gaps - these countries were considered representative of the region in terms of fisheries systems and capacity levels (Chapters 2 to 8). The picture that emerged showed that by country Sey chelles and Mauritius had the strongest capacity for MCS in the region, with Kenya, Madagascar, and the United Republic of Tanzania having partial to weak capacity and the Comoros and Somalia having the weakest capacity.

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