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Social Protection, Resilience and Climate Change - A new learning tool










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    Booklet
    Kwinda Nyama: A multiplayer hunting game for social learning and sustainable use 2024
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    Games can help people learn about complex issues, make choices and adapt their actions as they observe the consequences of their choices. They allow adults and children to explore, safely, different scenarios that can generate a variety of outcomes depending on the choices they make as they play the game. Therefore, the Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS) with support from the SWM Programme, developed this low-tech, multiplayer decision-making game to play with rural communities in the Republic of the Congo and in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. This Manual explains the rules and materials needed to play the Kwinda Nyama game which tests players’ responses to different hunting scenarios with different rules. The SWM Programme is a major international initiative that aims to improve the conservation and sustainable use of wildlife in forest, savannah and wetland ecosystems. It is being funded by the European Union with co-funding from the French Facility for Global Environment (FFEM) and the French Development Agency (AFD). Projects are being piloted and tested with governments and communities in 17 participating countries. The initiative is coordinated by a dynamic consortium of four partners, namely the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), the Center for International Forestry Research and World Agroforestry (CIFOR-ICRAF), the French Agricultural Research Centre for International Development (CIRAD) and the Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS).
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    Booklet
    Human–wildlife conflict role-playing game
    User guide
    2023
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    The Sustainable Wildlife Management (SWM) Programme in Zimbabwe created role-playing games especially for use in Farmer Field Schools. Their primary aim is to learn about human–wildlife conflict (HWC) scenarios alongside the farmers who are most impacted by them. Role-playing games have a lot of potential, especially when the training’s performance objectives involve complex problem-solving. Participants in these games do not just observe; they actively participate in simulations that require group decision-making and interaction. The SWM Programme is funded by the European Union with co-funding from the French Facility for Global Environment (FFEM) and the French Development Agency (AFD). The initiative is coordinated by a dynamic consortium of four partners, namely the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), the Center for International Forestry Research and World Agroforestry (CIFOR-ICRAF), the French Agricultural Research Centre for International Development (CIRAD) and the Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS).
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    Presentation
    Adopting anticipatory action and shock-responsive social protection to strengthen disaster preparedness and resilience: Learning from the ASEAN region
    Webinar – 4 April 2022: Key takeaway messages
    2022
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    This webinar, the fifth webinar of a series on Anticipatory Action, was called “Adopting Anticipatory Action and shock-responsive social protection to strengthen disaster preparedness and resilience: Learning from the ASEAN region”. It was co-organised with the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) Secretariat, in close collaboration with the Asia-Pacific Regional technical working group on Anticipatory Action and support from the European Union, by the Knowledge Sharing Platform on Resilience, within the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations’ (FAO's) Office of Emergencies and Resilience. Since May 2019, the FAO-led consortium of United Nations (UN) agencies (World Food Programme, United Nations Children's Fund, UN Women), Red Cross Red Crescent Movement (German Red Cross and International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies) and non-governmental organizations (NGOs) (Save the Children International, People in Need, and Dan Church Aid) have been implementing the Directorate-General for European Civil Protection and Humanitarian Aid Operations (DG ECHO)-funded project: Scaling up Anticipatory Action and Shock Responsive Social Protection (SRSP) with innovative use of climate risk information for disaster resilience in ASEAN. The ambition of this project was to introduce new and innovative approaches in the implementation of the ASEAN Agreement on Disaster Management and Emergency Response and its work programme. Since its inception, the project has been implementing the ASEAN Guidelines on Disaster Responsive Social Protection to support country roadmaps to incorporate it alongside Anticipatory Action. Specific target countries included: Cambodia, Myanmar, the Philippines and Viet Nam. In mid-October 2021, the project commissioned an independent external evaluation to assess the: (i) relevance of ECHO-supported interventions since 2017; (ii) efficiency and effectiveness of implementation encompassing partnerships, operational arrangements and resource utilization; (iii) achievement of results and impacts on capacity development of ASEAN member states, particularly project target countries and ASEAN; and (iv) cross-cutting issues including inclusivity and resilience. The participatory review process involved all relevant stakeholders: beneficiaries, government officials, ASEAN sector bodies, implementing UN agencies, NGO partners and others. Against this background, the webinar specifically aimed to: • present the key findings on the progress of advancing Anticipatory Action and SRSP in ASEAN (and beyond) through an institutionalized approach; • illustrate project results and lessons learned relevant to the adoption, institutionalization and sustainable financing of Anticipatory Action and SRSP, including meaningful evidence of the project’s COVID-19 cash transfer impacts on beneficiaries; and • discuss recommendations for further scaling up and sustaining the proven approaches.

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