Thumbnail Image

Climate Change and Agrobiodiversity in Nepal: Opportunities to include agrobiodiversity maintenance to support Nepal’s National Adaptation Programme of Action (NAPA)

A report prepared by LI-BIRD for the Platform for Agrobiodiversity Research in collaboration with FAO and Bioversity International








Also available in:
No results found.

Related items

Showing items related by metadata.

  • Thumbnail Image
    Book (stand-alone)
    Legume Trees and other Fodder Trees as Protein Sources for Livestock 1992
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    Fodder trees and fodder shrubs have always played a significant role in feeding domestic animals. In fact, trees and shrubs are increasingly recognized as important components of animal feeding, particularly as suppliers of protein and especially in harsh environmental conditions. In such situations, the available grazing is not generally sufficient to meet the maintenance requirements of animals, at least for part of the year. This occurs, for example, in some mountainous regions and in the dry tropicswhere the grazing is also sometimes very degraded. Thus, in extensive animal production systems in the dry areas of Africa, it is generallye stimated that ligneous materials contribute up to 90% of production and account for 40-50% of the total available feed. Such figures illustrate the existing and urgent need not only for better knowledge but also for better use of such potential, particularly in the context of environmental degradation which is affecting our planet. On the other ha nd, in the humid tropics of Latin America, the South-cast Asia and Africa, foddersfrom trees and shrubs from leguminous species - are beginning to be utilized more dietary nitrogen supplements for ruminants. In this respect, new a significant move to look for new sources of protein from shrubs. However, given the increasing demand for forage and availability of low quality basal feed materials which require protein supplementation, high protein fodders from leguminous trees and shrubs could have a much more significant role in animal feeding systems throughout the developing world. In this respect, there is a need for more research to develop technically viable solutions. These solutions must also be economically and socially acceptable; they must preserve natural resources and protect the environment. In other words, the challenge is the sustainable development of fodder trees and shrubs.........
  • Thumbnail Image
    Book (stand-alone)
    Agrobiodiversity - a training manual for farmer groups in East Africa 2018
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    Farmers play a crucial role in the preservation and sustainable use of agrobiodiversity. In fact, the diversity of species that support our current agricultural production systems has been carefully managed and shaped by farming communities, over the course of the history of humankind. Farmers act as custodian of the Earth’s agrobiodiversity resources, and play a big part in preserving traditional plant and animal varieties, and the knowledge associated with these. FAO has long been working on promoting approaches to agriculture that enable both the sustainable use of biodiversity resources for food and agriculture, and their conservation, and on supporting farmers to make informed decisions on their farm management and production practices. This training manual fits in this broader commitment, to support a shift towards a paradigm of agricultural production that can sustain food and nutrition security while at the same time cause the least harm to natural ecosystems. The manual is intended as an introduction to agricultural biodiversity, and to its relevance to different aspects of agricultural production and management for smallholder farmers in Kenya. It includes eight different training modules, each covering a specific aspect related to agrobiodiversity. The modules are standalone and can be used independently one from the other, depending on the user’s or project’s aim. The materials were originally prepared within the FAO- Netherlands Partnership Programme (FNPP) and have been updated, revised and published under the second phase of the European Union-funded project “Capacity-building related to multilateral environmental agreements (MEAs) in Africa, Caribbean and Pacific (ACP) countries”.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Booklet
    Soils, where food begins
    Outcome document of the Global Symposium on soils for nutrition, 26–29 July 2022
    2023
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    The Global Symposium on Soils for Nutrition outcome document highlights the latest research findings and multisectoral insights which evidenced that nutrient imbalance is a global and crosscutting threat with multifactorial drivers and effects on the agrifood systems and even on key planetary processes. The recommendations presented in this document aim to support the implementation of actions and development of policies towards healthy and fertile soils by 2030, allowing the sustainable production of more nutritious and safer food with a climatic and environmentally friendly approach and in the framework of achieving the Sustainable Development Goals. This document also collates the communication campaign aimed at positioning the soils for nutrition topic in the public eye. The Global Symposium on Soils for Nutrition was held virtually from 26 to 29 July 2023. It was attended by over 9 500 participants representing more than 180 countries, including representatives of FAO Members, organizing institutions, academia, research institutions, the private sector, civil society, and farmers, as well as land users working on soil fertility, nutrient imbalances and related fields. This document is also based on the booklet “Soils for nutrition: state of the art" and is complemented by a book of proceedings, which presents extended abstracts of the various parallel sessions and posters presented during the symposium. Symposium website: https://www.fao.org/events/detail/symposium-soils-for-nutrition/en

Users also downloaded

Showing related downloaded files

No results found.