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Analysis of the Medium-Term Effects of Hurricane Mitch on Food Security in Central America









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    Project
    Rebuilding Fisheries Livelihoods in Abaco and Grand Bahama Islands Following Hurricane Dorian - TCP/BHA/3703 2022
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    The northernmost islands of the Bahamas (Grand Bahama and Abaco) are regularly exposed to hurricanes The islands are of low elevation, rendering the communities vulnerable to flooding caused by the storm surges associated with storms and hurricanes Although the communities prepare themselves each year for the storm season, the consequences of these hurricanes for the livelihoods of the population and the economy of the islands are significant A large part of the local population depends on fisheries for its livelihood, and natural disasters such as hurricanes and tropical storms cause large scale and prolonged instability Hurricane Dorian impacted Grand Bahama and Abaco from 1 to 3 September 2019 for approximately 68 hours The category 5 hurricane devastated Abaco, Grand Bahama and the surrounding Cays, with the southern eye wall remaining “ for around 36 hours over Grand Bahama At the peak of the storm, sustained winds reached 298 km/h with gusts of up to 354 km/h Estimated rainfall was 305 381 mm/day and the storm surge was estimated to be as high as 5 5 7 m above sea level At least 13 000 homes and many other buildings, roads and structures were destroyed, mainly by strong wind and flood as a result of the storm surge The fishery sector is of critical importance for the two islands as it produces roughly 40 percent of the total Bahamian fishery production for export.
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    Brochure, flyer, fact-sheet
    The Republic of Honduras | Urgent call for assistance
    Hurricanes Eta and Iota
    2020
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    Hurricanes Eta and Iota are the most severe natural hazards that have hit Honduras in more than 20 years. Early November, Category 4 Hurricane Eta started bringing torrential rains and winds as strong as 275 km/h in northern Honduras. During its slow three-day journey over Nicaragua, Honduras and Guatemala, Eta downgraded to a tropical storm and then onto a tropical depression, with heavy rains in much of Honduras and causing river levels to rise, flooding and landslides across the country. On 16 November 2020, Category 5 Hurricane Iota made landfall, which went from being a major storm to a tropical depression following almost the same path as Eta. Hurricane Iota caused even more flooding and wind damage, affecting already vulnerable communities following the passage of Eta, further aggravating humanitarian needs and food insecurity. In a country where 1.65 million people were facing acute food insecurity at crisis or worse levels, the impact of the hurricanes is likely to have increased the number of people in IPC Phase 3+. This is linked to the sudden decrease in food access and availability, labour, loss of productive assets and crops, damage in production areas, supply and the depletion of food reserves. The livelihoods of rural populations are devastated and the situation is threatening the most vulnerable population groups, who experience higher constraints in accessing food, and will face a rapid deterioration of their food security and nutrition, forcing them to adopt negative coping mechanisms.
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    Brochure, flyer, fact-sheet
    Subregional Central America | Hurricanes Eta and Iota
    Urgent call for assistance
    2021
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    Central America has been severely affected by a record-breaking hurricane season, with Category 4 Hurricane Eta raging through the region at the beginning of November, followed by Category 5 Hurricane Iota just about two weeks later. The heavy rains, strong winds, flash floods and storm surges triggered by the Hurricanes have affected a total of about 8.3 million people across Guatemala, Honduras and Nicaragua, which are already hard hit by years of erratic weather patterns and more recently by the effects of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, resulting in potentially significant catastrophic impacts. Guatemala, Honduras and Nicaragua were the most heavily affected countries in the region. Supporting small-scale farmers and other affected households who lost crops and productive assets from the early onset of the lean season through the primera harvest (March‑September 2021) is essential to restore their livelihoods.

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