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Uncovering Dynamics of Global Mangrove Gains and Losses









Contessa, V.; Dyson, K.;Vivar Mulas, P.P.; Kindgard, A.; Liu, T.; Saah, D.; Tenneson, K.; Pekkarinen, A. Uncovering Dynamics of Global Mangrove Gains and Losses. RemoteSens. 2023, 15, 3872. https://doi.org/10.3390/rs15153872


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    This report provides global and regional estimates of the area covered by mangrove forests, including area changes between 2000 and 2020. It analyses the drivers of these global, regional and subregional changes for the periods 2000–2010 and 2010–2020 with the aim of improving understanding of these drivers, their interactions and how their relative importance has shifted over time. In the study that underpins this report, FAO developed and validated an easy, repeatable methodology that integrates remote sensing with local knowledge. An FAO team and 48 image interpreters worldwide collected and analysed data on mangrove area in 2020, change in mangrove area between 2000 and 2020, and the drivers of change over the two decades. It is the first global study of mangrove area to provide information on land use rather than land cover.
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    Comparative analysis of livelihood recovery in the post-conflict periods – Karamoja and Northern Uganda 2019
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    This paper examines the parallel but separate trajectories of peace-building, recovery and transformation that have occurred over the past 15 years in northern (Acholi and Lango sub-regions) and northeastern (Karamoja sub-region) Uganda. While keeping in mind the key differences in these areas, we highlight the similarities in the nature of recovery, the continuing challenges and the need for external actors to keep in mind the ongoing tensions and vulnerability that could undermine the tenuous peace. The initial peace processes in both northern Uganda and Karamoja were largely top-down in nature, with little participation from the affected populations. In Karamoja, the Ugandan military started a forced disarmament campaign in 2006. This was the second such effort in five years and was top-down and heavy-handed. Although many observers gave it little chance of success, by 2013 large-scale cattle raids were infrequent, and road ambushes were almost non-existent. Critically, local initiatives eventually emerged in parallel to the top-down disarmament efforts. Prime amongst these were local resolutions adopted in 2013–2014 that created a system of compensation for thefts, enforced by “peace committees.” In northern Uganda, a top-down, politically negotiated peace process between the Lord’s Resistance Army (LRA) and the Government of Uganda ended two decades of fighting in 2006. The internally displaced person (IDP) camps were disbanded, and thousands of displaced people returned to their rural homes, some because they no other option once assistance in the camps ceased. One of the most important factors in recovery in Karamoja has been the growth of markets. Traders were reluctant to bring wares to the region during the period of insecurity, and hence goods were few and prices high. Today, most trading centres host markets on a weekly basis, and shops have consistent inventories. In northern Uganda, the biggest driver of recovery has been the return of displaced people to their homes and the resumption of farming. By 2011, crop production had resumed its pre-conflict status as the primary livelihood in the region. In both locations, however, engagement in markets is limited, and many people remain economically marginalized. Challenges to recovery and long-term stability are similar across the two locations. Both northern Uganda and Karamoja continue to struggle with food insecurity and malnutrition, despite the massive influx of development funds, improved security and expansion of markets. In northern Uganda, the conflict continues to influence household livelihoods. Households that have a member who experienced war crimes are consistently worse off. These continuing problems with food security and nutrition call into question many assumptions about recovery and development. In particular, the idea that peace will bring a natural bounce in economic and household well-being does not appear to hold up in these cases. Additional structural challenges to recovery in both locations include climate change and environmental degradation, poor governance and corruption, limited opportunities for decent work, livelihood transformation and loss, and conflict over land. These factors reinforce each other and make it extremely difficult for average households to develop sustainable and secure livelihoods. External interventions often fail to take into account the local priorities and realities in these areas. Many programmes are place based or focus on rural areas, but the population is in flux. This is especially true for young people. In addition, while many people are doing much better than they were 15 years ago, others are being pushed out of pastoralism and are struggling to achieve diversified and sustainable livelihoods. Overall, while the recent trajectories of recovery in Karamoja and northern Uganda are remarkably similar, the context, livelihoods and challenges in each location are importantly unique. National actors should not seek to derive combined approaches or policies that lump together these two areas. In both cases, the lived reality, history and experiences of the population should be central to designing appropriate, effective and sustainable responses to the ongoing obstacles to a stable peace and full recovery.
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    Mangroves are biodiversity- and carbon-rich socio-ecological ecosystems that provide essential goods and services to millions of people. In particular, food, medicine, and wood, which is the primary source of energy and construction material for several Indigenous Peoples and Local Communities (IPLCs) living in coastal areas. Mangrove loss and degradation occur at alarming rates putting at risk the traditional livelihoods of IPLCs. Community-led mangrove conservation could be a cost-effective solution to conserve mangrove forests, their ecosystem services, and biological diversity within and beyond protected areas. Although community-based mangrove conservation is a common practice, few successful case studies are known. In West Mexico, IPLCs have been conserving and managing mangrove ecosystems for decades to produce mangrove wood for both domestic and commercial purposes. Through participatory planning, zones have been designated for conservation, wood production, water bodies protection, and restoration. Historical mangrove cover change analysis for the periods 1970/1980, 2005 and 2010 revealed forest expansion within the community-led conserved area (UMA), including in wood production zones. West Mexico is a unique case study that could provide valuable mangrove conservation best practices and lessons learned to other communities around the world. This community-based conservation strategy may contribute to achieving national and international environmental and biodiversity targets by providing multiple socio-ecological and economic benefits from local to global scales if implemented with a rights-based conservation perspective that incorporates multidisciplinary and participatory scientific assessments and traditional knowledge. It could also enhance sustainable local traditional livelihoods and biocultural practices while reducing illegal logging and contributing to mitigating the effects of climate change and biodiversity loss through nature-based solutions. Keywords: Rights-based Conservation; Sustainable Livelihoods; Community-based Decision-making;Mangroves; Community-led Nature-based Solutions ID: 3487429

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