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The Ecosystem Approach to Fisheries in Practice







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    Towards the Future We Want - End Hunger and make the transition to sustainable agricultural and food systems 2012
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    Improving agricultural and food systems is essential for a world with healthier people and healthier ecosystems. Healthy and productive lives cannot be achieved unless ?all people at all times have physical, social and economic access to sufficient, safe and nutritious food which meets their dietary needs and food preferences for an active and healthy life? (FAO, 1996). Healthy ecosystems must be resilient and productive, and provide the goods and services needed to meet current societal needs a nd desires without jeopardizing the options for future generations to benefit from the full range of goods and services provided by terrestrial, aquatic and marine ecosystems. There are very strong linkages between the conditions to achieve universal food security and nutrition, responsible environmental stewardship and greater fairness in food management. They intersect in agricultural and food systems at the global, national and local levels. To emphasize these links, FAO has three main messag es for the Rio+20 summit: - The Rio vision of sustainable development cannot be realized unless hunger and malnutrition are eradicated. - The Rio vision requires that both food consumption and production systems achieve more with less. - The transition to a sustainable future requires fundamental changes in the governance of food and agriculture and an equitable distribution of the transition costs and benefits. FAO believes that the Rio vision will remain unfulfilled as long a s hunger and malnutrition persist. The sustainable management of agriculture and food systems is key to a sustainable future. Sound policies are needed to create the incentives and capacities for sustainable consumption and production and to enable consumers and producers to make sustainable choices.
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    A fishery manager's guidebook - Second edition 2009
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    Fisheries around the world make essential contributions to human well-being including the provision of basic food supplies. employment, recreational opportunities. foreign currency and others, providing benefits to hundreds of millions of people. Despite these benefits, our record of managing fisheries so that the benefits can be sustained has been poor; at best, and most fisheries around the world are experiencing serious ecological, social or economic problems and usually all three. Today there is global concern about the state of fishery resources and aquatic ecosystems, their resilience to future stresses such as climate change and their ability to continue to provide benefits. Fisheries management Is the process that has evolved to try to ensure that fisheries operate in a manner that provides the immediate benefits in a sustainable manner. The widely accepted goal is that the full range of benefits should not only be available for this generation but for gen erations to come. fisheries management has been successful in some cases but there have also been many, many cases of failure. This volume is intended to contribute to Improving this unsatisfactory state by addressing the widespread need for Information and guidance on the broad and often complex task of fisheries management. It is an updated and expanded edition of AFishery Manager’s Guidebook which was published as a FAO Fisheries Technical Paper in 2002. The major part of this new edition is divided into five parts intended to cover the range of concerns, tools and techniques essential to the modem fisheries manager, whether that manager Is an Individual or a formal or Informal group. following the Introduction: Part I examines the primary dimensions of fisheries: biological, ecological. social and economic Part Ii looks at the legal and Institutional characteristics of fisheries Part III explores the tools that fishery managers have to achieve the objectives e xpected from a fishery Part IV discusses the role of scientific Information of Indicators and reference points Part V moves Into Implementation of fisheries management and Includes a chapter on special considerations In small-scale fisheries It concludes with a chapter that summarises the current state of knowledge and best practices and looks ahead to possible futures for fisheries governance. This landmark publication is intended to be a practical guide to those actively engaged In fisheries management and will be of particular Interest to fishery managers and scientists. All libraries in research establishment and universities where fisheries and aquatic sciences are studied and taught will need copies of this Important volume.
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    Estimated catch, price and value for national fleet sectors from pelagic fisheries in the Lesser Antilles
    Scientific Basis for Ecosystem-Based Management in the Lesser Antilles Including Interactions with Marine Mammals and Other Top Predators (LAPE)
    2008
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    Catch data are required for estimation of fishing mortality and for representation of fleet dynamics in the Lesser Antilles Pelagic Ecosystem (LAPE) model. The relative extractions by country and fleet type are used to investigate a range of policy scenarios (effort control) for management of shared stocks of pelagic species. A review by the LAPE project concluded that the use of the regional fisheries statistical system (CariFIS) database is still limited and that there remained dat a management issues which were major impediments to full implementation of CariFIS in national fisheries statistics systems. The additional time and technical assistance required to solve these problems are beyond the scope of the LAPE Project. It was necessary therefore to acquire the data by either extraction from international databases at Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) and the International Commission for the Conservation of Atlantic Tunas (ICCAT) or a re-examination of country data holdings in the variety of software used (CariFIS, MS EXCEL, MS ACCESS). By preference, data were obtained from national sources; however, data were used from the international databases when individual country data proved inaccessible. This report documents the modifications to available data and assumptions made in arriving at estimates of total catch and value of pelagic fisheries in the LAPE region. It is not intended to give a detailed analysis of catches in the region, but rather to provide information in the format necessary

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