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Poster: Producing Machines for Organic and Small-scale Farming System

Innovation in Agroecology from Tanzania








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    Book (stand-alone)
    Impacts of climate change on farming systems and livelihoods in the Near East North Africa. With a special focus on small-scale family farming
    Regional Initiative on Small-scale Family Farming for the Near East and North Africa
    2018
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    Achieving the Sustainable Development Goals of eradicating poverty (SDG 1), hunger (SDG 2) and clean water and sanitation (SDG 6) is not possible without directly addressing the impacts of climate change (SDG 13). Agriculture and food systems are on the forefront of this challenge and nowhere is this more evident than in the Near East and North Africa (NENA) region. Climate change is projected to increase temperatures and extreme weather events and reduce precipitation and weather predictability. While there will be variations based on local specificity, this will result in a general reduction of the production and productivity of both crops and livestock throughout the farming systems in the NENA region. Small-scale farmers’ livelihoods are at risk due to their direct dependence on natural resources. Further, given that they are the main domestic agricultural producers, the impacts of climate change on these farmers extends beyond the farm to the food security of the region. This makes it even more important for policymakers to determine the most effective ways to support small-scale farmers to ensure that agricultural production and productivity can be managed under changing climate conditions and increasing uncertainty.
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    Project
    Outline Report. Regional project completion workshop “Small-Scale Farmer Inclusion in Organic Agriculture Development through Participatory Guarantee Systems (PGS)”
    TCP/RAS/3510
    2018
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    In 2013, during the “Asia Pacific Symposium on Entrepreneurship and Innovation in Organic Farming” jointly organized by FAO and IFOAM- Organics international, countries requested technical assistance for the establishment and promotion of Participatory Guarantee Systems (PGS) certification schemes in the region. In response to this request and an increasing demand for organic products from consumers in the region to ensure food safety, an FAO pilot project on “Small-Scale Farmer Inclusion in Organic Agriculture Development through Participatory Guarantee Systems (PGS)” (TCP/RAS/3510) initiated on 01 September 2015 and ended on 31 December 2017. The project’s outcome was “an increased number of farmers produce organic crops and market them in a remunerative way to increased number of consumers through PGS” and was implemented by FAO and the Ministry of Agriculture Forestry and Fisheries (MAFF) in Cambodia and by the Ministry of Agriculture and Forestry (MAF) in Lao PDR, in collaboration with international partners such as IFOAM- Organics international, Earth Net Foundation (ENF) and many other local partners, including the Cambodian Center for Study and Development in Agriculture (CEDAC), the Center for Organic Development, Cambodia (COD), the Natural Agriculture Village Cambodia (NAV), Caritas Cambodia, Groupe de Recherches et d’Echanges Technologiques Lao PDR (GRET) and the Sustainable Agriculture and Environment Development Association Lao PDR (SAEDA
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    Brochure, flyer, fact-sheet
    Pro-Sahel – Innovation and technology in small-scale irrigation systems for small-scale producers in the Sahel
    Project brief
    2023
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    Water is scarce and pivotal for the Sahel, not only for increasing the productivity for millions of small-scale farmers but also for countering loss of arable land resulting from erosion and warming temperatures. A major barrier to the use of water in the Sahel is the lack of infrastructure and technologies – 45 percent of the population do not have access to water, and only 2 percent of arable land is irrigated (OECD, 2022). Technologies that are context specific can help increase agricultural productivity and attract investments, thereby accelerating sustainable development. Investments in such technologies can improve financial returns from irrigated crop land. While irrigation technologies are a primary need in the Sahel, other technologies can also contribute to improved performance of agrifood systems. In 2021, under the leadership of the Chief Scientist Office, FAO piloted the Pro-Sahel project, which aims to scale up investments in irrigation technologies for small-scale farmers in the Niger and Burkina Faso. The Pro-Sahel project invested USD 500 000 to deliver two national roadmaps for investing in and scale up of small-scale irrigation technologies. The project was conducted in close partnership with Akademiya2063, an African institution specialized in economic analysis and policy advice for African development, together with national stakeholders from the agriculture and irrigation sectors in Burkina Faso and Niger, and FAO Country Offices, the FAO Regional Office for Africa, the Hand-in-Hand initiative, and expertise from the Investment Centre in Rome.

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