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Phased agricultural livelihood needs assessment framework and tools








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    Book (stand-alone)
    Guidelines for the fisheries and aquaculture sector on damage and needs assessments in emergencies 2013
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    In the last few decades, natural disasters have become more frequent and increasingly destructive. Populations depending on fisheries and aquaculture for their livelihoods are threatened not only by natural hazards but also by human-induced events and other developments beyond their control. Most small-scale fishers and fish workers live in developing countries, and they often face a multitude of problems that increase their vulnerability to hazards, such as pollution, environmental degradation, overexploitation of resources, high levels of accidents at sea and conflicts with industrial fishing operations. Many coastal communities are also particularly vulnerable to hazards resulting from poverty and food insecurity. The particular characteristics of the fisheries sector and the livelihood context of small-scale fishers and fish farmers and their communities need to be clearly understood in order to be able to provide adequate disaster response in an emergency situation. An assessment of disaster impact is essential, not only for supporting the decision-making process before and during the immediate relief efforts, but also to set the basis for longer-term recovery planning. Support to countries and to partners in response to disasters and to emergencies is becoming a greater part of the work of international agencies. In order to improve these responses, the international community has been developing new approaches to disaster preparedness. The “cluster approach”, adopted by the Inter-Agency Standing Committee (IASC) in 2006, is now used as the main mechanism to ensure effective, coordinated and time-critical emergency response. Within the cluster approach, FAO has been designated as the cluster lead
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    Document
    FAO/WFP Joint Evaluation of Food Security Cluster Coordination in Humanitarian Action
    Evaluation Report
    2014
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    The Emergency Relief Coordinator and the Inter-Agency Standing Committee (IASC) introduced the cluster system in 2005 as part of a wider reform of the humanitarian system. In 2010, the global food security cluster (FSC), co-led by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) and WFP, was created to coordinate food security interventions in emergencies. The global FSC has 47 members and a Global Support Team (GST), based in Rome with an average of 12 staff members and a cum ulative budget of USD 7 million for January 2011 to January 2014.1 Global humanitarian funding for food and agriculture over the same period was about USD 12.5 billion.2 The GST facilitates coordination at the global level and supports both formal food security clusters and other food security coordination systems in more than 40 countries. Structures and resources for coordination vary widely, ranging from situations in which there are no dedicated resources for coordination, to those with coor dination and information management teams at the country and hub levels, with direct costs of up to USD 1 million per year. The global FSC supports country-level coordination mechanisms through surge and support missions, tools, guidance, training and information management. Food security coordination mechanisms at the country and local levels can support all stages of a humanitarian response, including preparedness, needs assessment and analysis, strategy formulation, implementation, reporting and learning. This coordination is expected to improve the capacity of humanitarian organizations to respond strategically and coherently, and to reduce gaps and duplications. Ultimately, it is expected to result in improved services to the populations affected by crises and emergencies.
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    Book (series)
    Aquaculture needs assessment mission report. Nairobi, Kenya
    GCP/RAF/466/EC SmartFish Project
    2013
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    The Aquaculture Needs Assessment of Kenya was jointly organized by the Government of Kenya and the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), under the framework of the project GCP/RAF/466/EC “Implementation of a Regional Fisheries Strategy for the Eastern and Southern Africa and Indian Ocean Region”, otherwise known as SmartFish. SmartFish is funded by the European Union (EU) through the Indian Ocean Commission (IOC) and co-implemented by the FAO. The needs assessment is one of the activities being implemented under Result 5M3.1 Sustainable Aquaculture Development Promotion, which responds to African countries’ desire to contribute their efforts to transform aquaculture from a non-viable, subsistence and public sector driven economy, to a resourceful, vibrant, private sector led sustainable enterprise. The needs assessment was carried out at specific sites in the western part of the country. The study involved: a desk review for the purpose of having background inf ormation about the sector; the site selection of study areas for the mission; the development of assessment tools and approach, ensuring FAO approval for their use; the execution of field assessments in the selected sites; and the production of this report. This report outlines the training needs and a training delivery plan; legal registration and networking recommendations; input requirements; as well as a distribution plan and costing. The desk review was done in the last week of June 2013. A field mission in Western Kenya was conducted over three weeks in August 2013. Report writing took three weeks in September 2013. The report was submitted in the third week of October 2013. Training of fish farmer groups, and provision of equipment and inputs to these groups, is scheduled for January and February 2014. This needs assessment focused on training and inputs, such as equipment and materials that are required by fish farmer groups. The assessment took place with fish farmer groups in Kisii, Kakamega, Homa Bay, Vihiga, Siaya, and Busia counties in Western Kenya. The training modules identified include: Best Management Practices (BMPs); group cohesion and development; aqua-business skills; marketing; record and book keeping; and efficient production technologies. Equipment needs include: deep freezers; sampling and harvesting nets; secchi disks; cool boxes; harvesting baskets; hapa nets; and weighing scales. From the study it is anticipated that the end point of the selected beneficiary clusters should be stand-alone, self-sufficient market structures that offer investors the best prices for inputs and products. It is also anticipated that once this end point is reached, the fish farm clusters should serve as the nuclei in an effort to expand market clusters to other small and medium enterprise investors across the country, and the region at large. The purpose was to assess the needs for aquaculture production and marketing in selected fish farmer organizations, so as to guide the support and investment choices for enhancement for sustainable aquaculture productivity and profitability in Western Kenya.  5 Recommendations include the following:  The groups to benefit from capacity building and provision of equipment include: Central Kakamega Aquaculture Cooperative; Muungano Fish Farmers (Bidii Fish Farmers and Yala Fish Farmers Cluster); Tilapia Fish Farmers Group; Wangchieng Fish Farmers Cluster; and the Butula Fish Farmers Cooperative;  The groups s hould be strengthened through training on group cohesion and market linkages;  Documentation of the work in the form of a video documentary should be undertaken to serve as a training tool. The aim is to develop long-term market linkages that optimize profits for group members.

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