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Reducing human-carnivore conflict through participatory research










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    Planning for human-wildlife coexistence 2023
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    The Projeto Onças do Iguaçu (Jaguars of Iguaçu Project) aims to protect the jaguar population in the Iguaçu National Park (INP) in Brazil and Iguazú National Park in Argentina, fostering coexistence with local communities. The planning for coexistence involved a stakeholder analysis, workshop, and structured approach. Using a Human-Wildlife Interaction (HWI) diagram, current interactions were categorized as conflict, overexploitation, nuisance, or coexistence. Scoping and goal-setting exercises defined the desired changes, targeting family farmers, increasing jaguar numbers, and shifting community attitudes. A system map identified causal relationships affecting interactions, revealing leverage points for intervention. A Theory of Change (ToC) outlined the sequence of events to achieve outcomes, guiding data collection for monitoring. Lessons learned included aligning actions with goals, conducting strategic planning before activities, involving staff with shared goals, and utilizing baseline data. The process fostered teamwork and ownership among project members. The planning process provided a clear roadmap for the project, promoting coexistence between people and jaguars while protecting the region's jaguar population.
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    Building institutional and local community capacity to manage human-wildlife conflict 2023
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    This case study comes from Mozambique, where human-wildlife conflict was not a new issue in 2010. Incidents had been increasing, particularly those involving crocodiles Crocodylus niloticus, and also elephants Loxodonta africana and lions Panthera leo. These incidents impacted food security, local community incomes, well-being and safety, and were exacerbated by poverty levels. Human-wildlife conflict had become a major concern for the Government of Mozambique and led them to formulate a National Strategy for Human-Wildlife Conflict Management (2009-2014). The government approved the Strategy in 2009, and from 2010 its implementation was supported by FAO, through a Technical Cooperation Programme Project The FAO project's objective was to design an implementation plan for the Strategy with the expressed goal of mitigating human-wildlife conflicts and build the needed capacity in the country to be able to do so. This case study focuses on how capacity was built in Mozambique to implement the Strategy. By building capacity in the national government agencies, the FAO project empowered the government agencies to guide and implement the country's national strategy on human-wildlife conflict. The overhauled database, covering five years (2006-2010), was presented at the Council of Ministers, in order to underscore the importance of the situation in Mozambique, inform the Ministers of the problem, and highlight some of the tools available to reduce the impacts of human-wildlife conflict, particularly the crocodile cages that had been used and improved.
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    Project
    Promoting Sustainable Management of Human–Wildlife Conflict and Appropriate Agricultural Practices among Vulnerable Communities in Northern Zimbabwe - GCP/ZIM/032/JPN 2022
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    Human wildlife conflict (HWC) arises from the competition between growing populations of humans and wildlife for the same declining resources. Such conflict has proved a major issue in northern Zimbabwe. In Hurungwe District in the province of Mashonaland West, common examples of HWC include livestock predation, crop destruction, human attacks and conflict between farmers and protected area management. The resulting damage can impact food security, livelihoods and health. This project aimed to reduce HWC in target areas of Hurungwe by supporting local communities to implement sustainable methods of deterring wildlife and protecting livestock. At the same time, it sought to increase agricultural production and strengthen resilience by managing disease in livestock and promoting alternative livelihood options based on the sustainable, community based management of natural resources .

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