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Engineering a Better World – Sustainable Development of Agricultural and Forestry Systems







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    Project
    Making Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries More Sustainable and Resilient through Use of Nature-Based Solutions - GCP/GLO/436/IRE 2024
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    Nature based solutions (NBS) in agriculture and food systems encompass people centred and regenerative approaches targeted at restoring, sustainably managing and conserving the natural capital needed to buffer food systems and the livelihoods dependent upon them against shocks and crises, while supporting the achievement of sustainable development, climate and biodiversity goals. Considering the potential benefits to be derived from their application, a concerted effort is needed to scale up and optimize the use of NBS, integrating them into wider food system risk management, development and climate action strategies, such as disaster risk reduction, adaptation and mitigation. To support countries in optimizing the use of agricultural NBS, the project supported the development of a multidisciplinary diagnostic, planning and monitoring framework for investments at local and national levels. The tool aims to support countries to conduct better landscape planning and to mainstream issues of natural capital, ecosystem services and biodiversity into planning and investment decision making.
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    Booklet
    Developing sustainable food value chains - Practical guidance for systems-based analysis and design
    SFVC methodological brief
    2024
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    This brief outlines a rigorous and standardized approach for value chain analysis and design, taking a systems perspective to analyse and influence the behaviour and performance of value chain actors influenced by a complex environment. The brief also covers the design of upgrading strategies and associated development plans, based on the identification of root causes of value chain bottlenecks and using a participatory and multistakeholder approach. The brief is primarily based on FAO’s Sustainable Food Value Chain (SFVC) framework which promotes a systems-based development of agrifood value chains that are economically, socially and environmentally sustainable, as well as resilient to shocks and stressors. The end-product of the application of the methodology is a VC report with four components. The first two components, a functional analysis and a sustainability assessment, make up the VC analysis. The last two components, an upgrading strategy and a development plan, represent the VC design.
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    Book (stand-alone)
    Developing a roadmap towards increased sustainability in geographical indication systems
    Practical guidelines for producer organizations to identify priorities, assess performance and improve the sustainability of their geographical indication systems
    2024
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    FAO and the Global Alliance of Geographical Indications (oriGin) have been collaborating since 2016 to develop the Sustainability Strategy for Geographical Indications (SSGI). This strategy for sustainable GIs aims to highlight and strengthen the relationship between GI systems and sustainability, raise stakeholders’ awareness of their role in GI sustainability and boost the sustainability performance of GI systems. Geographical indications (GIs) are signs used on products that originate from a specific territory and possess qualities or a reputation related to that origin. Through their establishment and management, GIs can stimulate endogenous development when ensuring leadership by local producers, product specifications that are tailored to local conditions and recognition by buyers of products’ origin-linked qualities. This guide provides a practical step-by-step roadmap for GI organizations that wish to engage on their own sustainability journey. The roadmap consists of three key stages: 1. prioritize sustainability topics for the GI system and engage with public and private stakeholders; 2. assess needs and establish a baseline for each priority topic; and 3. monitor and improve the GI system’s sustainability performances, and regularly review the roadmap in collaboration with allies. Communication is the fourth crucial and transversal component of the roadmap; it improves efficiency during the process and allows stakeholders to share and celebrate the results. By following the eight steps outlined in this guide, with detailed guidance, examples and models, GI practitioners will be able to design a sustainability roadmap for their GI system, together with stakeholders.

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