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How can aquaculture improve agriculture in salinized areas?








FAO. 2021. How can aquaculture improve agriculture in salinized areas? Yangon.


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    Brochure, flyer, fact-sheet
    Sustainable saline agriculture for climate adaptation and mitigation: A call for action 2023
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    Saline agriculture is gradually being recognized as a response to the global challenge of salinization aggravated by climate change. The current document is the result of a collaboration between the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) and the Dutch Ministry of Agriculture, Nature and Food Quality, along with the Wageningen University & Research (WUR), the Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam (VU) and the Asian Development Bank (ADB), which led to a session dedicated to sustainable saline agriculture as a response to climate change. It was held at the Water Pavilion of the 26th Conference of Parties (COP26) of 2021. Further exchanges between these parties took place, leading to a commitment to advance saline agriculture. This document calls for a dynamic and inclusive international collaboration through partnerships to accelerate the development of sustainable and climate-smart agriculture on saline lands, and proposes the key steps that have to be taken to further the multilateral actions on saline agriculture at several levels.
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    Book (series)
    Recent advances in climate change vulnerability/risk assessments in the fisheries and aquaculture sector 2021
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    Vulnerability and risk assessment is an important tool that has been used in the fisheries and aquaculture sector to assess the current and potential consequences of climate change in a variety of geographical, environmental and socio-economic contexts and scales. The resulting information on risks and vulnerabilities can then feed decision-making on adaptation, including allocation of resources and prioritization of areas for action. However, there is no harmonized approach nor methodology to conduct vulnerability and risk assessments. This publication seeks to analyze the different existing methodologies in order to contribute to laying the basis of a consistent approach to design future climate vulnerability and risk assessments in the fisheries and aquaculture sector. The publication builds on the findings outlined in the FAO Technical Papers No. 597 “Assessing climate change vulnerability in fisheries and aquaculture - Available methodologies and their relevance for the sector” and No. 627 “Impacts of climate change on fisheries and aquaculture - Synthesis of current knowledge, adaptation and mitigation options” and explores the recent advances in approaches of vulnerability and risk assessments, and the methodological developments to conduct such assessments.
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    Book (stand-alone)
    Proceedings of the Global Forum on Salinization and Climate Change
    Abstracts and extended abstracts submitted to the Global Forum on Salinization and Climate Change (GFSCC2010), Valencia, 25-29 October, 2010
    2011
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    The relevance of the possible impact of climate change in many productive areas prompted the organization of a meeting considering the possible effects of climate change on cultivated lands, coastal areas and other areas under risk of salinization. This constituted a new approach to the prevention of the risk of salinization, and an attempt to develop strategies for early action at regional and global scale. The GFSCC2010 was the first forum of global participation on this subject. Soil saliniz ation is one of the more subtle and progressive causes of soil degradation, threatening some of the most productive lands currently under irrigated agriculture. It is also an increasing environmental concern for those areas for which suggested climate change scenarios predict aridity increase and/or sea level rise. Salinity is also a natural inherent condition of many ecosystems contributing to global biodiversity supporting halophytes. Salinization is a problem that has long being associated w ith agriculture, both as a constraint and as the result of inappropriate practices. In addition, agriculture intensification, as well as changes in temperature and precipitation patterns expected from climate change, are likely to further affect the salt-water balance of fragile ecosystems. Information on the relationship between climate change, salt-affected habitats and salinization processes is scarce. There is a need to establish a better picture of the most affected or vulnerable areas and to promote practices that can be used to adapt agricultural production in areas susceptible to climate change. This will contribute to food security and reduce stress on ecosystems. The forum constituted an opportunity to discuss, from a multi-disciplinary perspective, the problems associated with salinization and climate change and strengthened the dialogue between policy makers, scientists and field experts.

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