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State of knowledge on breeding for durable resistance to soybean rust disease in the developing world











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    Brochure, flyer, fact-sheet
    Strengthening regional collaboration and national capacities for management of wheat rust diseases and resistance breeding in Central Asia and the Caucasus (CAC-Rust) 2021
    The CAC-Rust project has been developed to address wheat rust diseases faced by the countries in Central Asia and the Caucasus. The project will facilitate regional collaboration and strengthen national capacities to improve surveillance, race analysis and integrated disease management. It will also support the development and deployment of disease resistant varieties. The project will support activities in key domains: • facilitation of regional collaboration and networking, training of national technical officers, • support for disease surveillance, race analysis and mapping in support of the global rust monitoring system, • characterization of the resistance properties of popular varieties, • support for breeding programmes for developing resistant varieties, • integrated disease management and farmer training, • development of national strategies and contingency plans, and • strengthen the capacities of institutions for rust management. The primary beneficiaries of the project will be the national institutions and officers involved in research, extension, seed systems, and plant protection, as well as the farmers in the seven countries in Central Asia and the Caucasus. Neighbouring countries and surrounding regions would also benefit from the knowledge generated.
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    Book (stand-alone)
    Sustainable wheat rust resistance – Learning from history 2011
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    The wheat rusts have a long history of causing considerable loss in productivity and quality of wheat crops. Much work has been undertaken to address this problem and many successes have been achieved. Sustainable rust resistance has been achieved in a number of situations and has provided valuable guidance for future initiatives where this level of protection has not been achieved. The achievements include understanding the impact of the sexual stage in the rust life cycle in facilitating resis tance breakdown and providing inoculum in close proximity to the developing wheat crop, resulting in more frequent and intense epiphytotics. Management options to minimize breakdown events have also been identified. The most significant discovery is that the rusts appear to lack the ability to overcome some sources of resistance, at least in the short term. These are termed durable resistances and their effective deployment in varieties where wheat rusts can be damaging to productivity would app ear to be a very effective strategy to achieve sustainable global rust resistance.
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    Book (stand-alone)
    FAO Wheat Rust Diseases Global Programme 2014–2017
    Strengthening capacities and promoting collaboration to prevent wheat rust epidemics
    2014
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    Wheat is a source of food and livelihoods for over 1 billion people in developing countries. A major staple food crop in many countries, it is an important source of nutrition, providing on average 40 percent of per capita calorie intake. Drought, floods and diseases severely affect wheat production. Exacerbated by climatic stress, especially in rainfed areas, the impact of wheat diseases is expected to increase. During the past decade a number of virulent strains of wheat rust diseases have eme rged, causing global concerns to wheat production. The wheat stem rust race Ug99 is highly virulent on the majority of world wheat varieties – the risk that it could cause a global epidemic is real. Ug99 is well established in East Africa and Yemen and has spread to the Islamic Republic of Iran. In 2010 and 2013, a new, virulent strain of yellow rust, Yr27, has caused severe outbreaks and losses in many countries in North and East Africa, the Near East and South Asia. Due to ever changing geneti cs of these pathogens they need to be monitored continuously. Wheat production in Northern and Eastern Africa, the Near East and West, Central and South Asia is vulnerable to rust diseases. These regions account for around 37 percent of global wheat production. The cost of a 10 percent loss in areas at risk is estimated to exceed USD 5.8 billion. The impact on food and nutrition security is estimable. To combat wheat rust diseases continuous surveillance as well as a programmatic management appr oach are essential.

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